Proposal

No annual report

Introduction

Proposal ID 2015-099
Submitted April 22, 2015
Owner angelk9@uw.edu
Department Forest Resources, College of
Category Portable
Funding Status Not Funded
Metric Score 3.86

Contacts

Primary
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • David Butman
  • Assistant Professor
  • dbutman@uw.edu
  • 206-685-0953
  • 352100
Budget
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Wendy Star
  • School Administrator
  • wkstar@uw.edu
  • 206-685-2047
  • 352100
Dean
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Lisa Graumlich
  • Dean of the College of the Environment
  • envdean@uw.edu
  • 206-221-0908
  • 352100

Descriptions

Abstract

This proposal for research equipment seeks to enhance and advance student education and field experience with the necessary specialized tools to identify and quantify relations among landscape pattern, anthropogenic development, and aquatic ecosystem structure and function. This proposal is a unique cross-school collaboration that expands the research opportunities at both the School of Environmental & Forest Sciences (SEFS) and the Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences at the School of Public Health (SPH), and will fulfill the needs of graduate and undergraduate students as they conduct either field-based and/or laboratory research.

The purchase of this equipment will foster scientific inquiry which is currently beyond student research ability due to a lack or limited availability of equipment. These devices will increase the depth and breadth of the ecological questions students can ask and speed the process of data collection and analysis in three ways: 1) provide new field equipment that is currently unavailable; 2) replace units that are outdated or in disrepair with technically superior instrumentation; and 3) access new technologies which will foster novel research perspectives and methodologies that are more efficient, cost effective and precise, all of which currently limit the ecological studies at SEFS and SPH.

The further intention of this request is to improve and add to Christian Torgersen’s Landscape and River Ecology lab, David Butman’s Riverine Biogeochemistry lab, and Marilyn Robert’s Environmental Microbiological lab technology needs. We are requesting funds to acquire field and laboratory equipment to measure watershed morphometry and hydrology, water physicochemistry, and microbial community structure. This information is critical to testing conceptual models of how terrestrial and riverine ecosystem processes are coupled at multiple scales; from the watershed to the land-water interface to nutrient-cycling, across any land-use gradient.

This proposal is organized in a way that each requested piece of equipment is a component of a total set of instrumentation that will improve water quality related research and allow students to build on the rapidly developing field of “reconciliation” ecology where the emphasis is creating, improving and maintaining habitat to conserve species diversity across developed landscapes. All students will be welcome to use this equipment through a reservation and check-out process or to request time in any of the laboratories for training and use of the equipment. All of this equipment will be available to students campus-wide and would set the University of Washington students apart by imparting technical expertise and opportunities to explore innovative experimental designs with cutting edge field and laboratory tools.

Category Justification

All of the equipment requested is durable, portable, and designed for field work. The Cepheid GeneExpert comes with a Pelican Box that safely stores all components for transportation between labs or field stations. Therefore all of this equipment should be classified under "Portable."

Background

The School of Environmental and Forest Sciences is composed of students engaging in many disciplines of ecology; soils, plant physiology, wildlife, forest management, biofuels, watershed and riverine ecology, instream biogeochemistry, and microbial ecology. Each of which actively engages in field research as a degree requirement. The techniques used in field work are not only the building blocks for professional careers but are vitally important for meeting the challenge of managing our natural resources in the face of increasing human population density, loss of biodiversity, water pollution, environmental antibiotic resistance, and the emergence of zoonotic diseases of people, and wild and domestic animals. All of these research areas are rapidly changing in the face of climate variability. In recent years there has been an increasing movement to understand how forest and riverine ecosystems will respond to shifts of climate regimes and there is a need to understand and reevaluate many basic principles of how biogeochemical cycles will be affected and the role that intact forests will play in maintaining a high quality and resilient environment. In the greater Seattle-Tacoma region our municipal water originates in protected watersheds and provide some of the cleanest drinking water in the country. The ability to accurately measure is one of the first step of scientific inquiry and requires the use of various advanced technologies that simultaneously increase professional skill required for employment across almost all disciplines.

Thus, in order to maintain University of Washington’s rigor and excellence in research in environmentally related fields, it is critical that students have access to an array of cutting-edge field and laboratory equipment during their academic experience.

One of the most important features of this proposal is that although water quality monitoring is a requirement for local, state and federal environmental agencies there is little capacity for water quality monitoring or analysis among the SEFS and SPH communities. Consequently, many research units and labs will benefit from the acquisition of this equipment which will increase not only the scale and scope of research being conducted in our school, but will make the University of Washington more relevant to the wider community of national and international university researchers by strengthening our technological capacity and expertise. We intend for this equipment to provide a framework in which; i) surface water ecological data can be rapidly collected and analyzed; ii) data can be banked with WAGDA and provide a chronological record of local water quality conditions, iii) data can be used across many disciplines at SEFS and SPH; and iv) increase the quality of the student research experience. In particular, the Sonde multiprobe for water physicochemistry is a commonly used tool for all water quality studies to understand land use impacts on instream ecological processes. We believe that acquiring equipment which has never been purchased before and updating standard field equipment such as GPS and Rangefinders will improve the quality of the data being collected, save research time, and offer economies of scale by its shared use.

Innovative equipment such as the Cepheid GeneExpert represents cutting edge tools for assessing key structural and functional states of ecological communities. For many reasons, the use of such equipment is important to test hypotheses about the complex relationships between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and the processes that are driven by the quality and quantity of subsidy exchange between them. One aspect that is extremely important is that the strategic combination of this equipment and other common tools currently being used by many students will improve the capacity for conducting novel research in landscape ecology and is a value added component to research for any topic at any level of study.

Benefits to Students and the University

The requested equipment will provide many benefits to the student body and the University of Washington in general. Primarily, these technologies will provide students access to a specialized equipment that is currently non-existent or very limited and to novel investigative tools. Students will benefit as they become proficient with state of the art sampling devices during their education, which will later reflect positively through their abilities to contribute to ongoing research in ecology, biology, forestry, wildlife science, biotechnology, environmental and occupational health, public health, and many other disciplines. All of this equipment will provide needed resources for the University of Washington Freshwater Initiative, a comprehensive effort to build and promote the expertise within the University within freshwater sciences.

This grant will help students become more marketable post-graduates by having experience with advanced data collection and analysis methods that will be facilitated by the acquisition of the requested equipment. Technology has a great influence on the methods selected and used in ecological research and the lack of robust tools limits scientific investigations, which in turn leads to slower development of ecological theory and practice.

Therefore, the use of novel, new or innovative technology will open new ways of thinking about the research approach and thereby the development of the conceptual framework from which we frame our theories and test our hypotheses.

Departmental Endorsements

Dear STF Review Committee,

I am writing in support of the STF proposal submitted by students in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS). As it stands now, SEFS does not have any capacity to develop cutting edge science that links terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemical cycling, however the state of the science suggests that these connections exists, and are critical to understand the human and climate impacts within watersheds. The technology within the EXO2 Sonde allows for the simultaneous measurements of stream metabolism and dissolved organic carbon, critical measurements to understand the base of the food-web within freshwater ecosystems. These systems will allow students to be trained on the most advanced deployable Sonde system available for freshwater and in collaboration with my own research developing methods to measure dissolved carbon dioxide and methane, would provide the necessary tools to measure and model the role that freshwaters play in regional carbon cycles. The data will provide time series information, uncover shifts in carbon and oxygen biogeochemistry during storm events, over seasons, and potentially over a full year. This proposal targets the acquisition of specialized research equipment that is applicable to a wide range of research topics that both graduate and undergraduate student are pursuing across the College of the Environment and have been previously identified by the members of the Freshwater Initiative as needed to begin developing robust science within the Puget Sound region. Finally, these Sondes are systems that have been identified as a need within the ‘Mountains to Sound’ initiative within the department of Civil and Environmental Engineering allowing students to get a jumpstart on data collection to develop robust proposals for additional student research support.

The equipment identified within this proposal will remain relevant for many years into the future, and will promote new analytical and data processing techniques utilizing high resolution aquatic chemistry and water quality data within a geospatial context. As a joint faculty member with Civil and Environmental Engineering (C&EE), I anticipate that this equipment will contribute to new classes under development as C&EE works to create a new bachelors in Environmental Engineering over the next year.

This proposal represents the critical first step in providing UW students the tools to develop the next generation of freshwater science from the field to the classroom. The skills obtained through using this technology are core to their future success in professional fields, which is becoming a requirement for employment.

Sincerely,
David Butman
Assistant Professor
School of Environmental & Forest Sciences
Civil & Environmental Engineering
University of Washington College of the Environment
phone: 206-685-0953
email: dbutman@uw.edu
website: www.thebutmanlab.com
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Student Technology Fee Proposal
Expanding field measurement capacity

Dear STF Review Committee,
I am writing in support of the STF proposal submitted by a group of students in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS). I am interacting with the School because of overlap with the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences. Both groups have a strong tradition and excellence of using technology to measure in the environment and using technology in our teaching, and then extending that technology to the collection of data in support of undergraduate and graduate training and research. This proposal targets the acquisition of specialized research equipment that is applicable to a wide range of research topics that both graduate and undergraduate students can utilize. The Cepheid machine will be used in both the College of the Environment and the School of Public Health. This equipment is state of the art tools and will be relevant to students conducting quality research in coming years. It will be also used in the undergraduate EOHS sampling class ENV433 which samples environments for various pathogens which I teach.

Your generous support will increase the training of our students in the latest technology. The skills obtained through using this technology is core to their future success in professional fields which is becoming a requirement for employment.

Thank you for considering this proposal in support of our students.

Sincerely,
Marilyn C. Roberts PhD
Professor Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, Molecular & Cellular Biology Program
Adjunct Professor, Global Health, Pediatric Dentistry
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
To: Student Technology Fee (STF) Review Committee
From: Christian Torgersen
Re: Letter of support for proposal submitted by graduate student Angel Klock

Dear STF Review Committee:

I would like to express my strong support for the proposal submitted by graduate student Angel Klock in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences (SEFS) for hydrological measurement instruments (flow meters, water quality sensors, and GPS units). Students and faculty in SEFS are increasingly conducting research that spans freshwater and terrestrial environments to evaluate impacts of land use on water quality. Every summer field season there has been a shortage of hydrological instruments for student use (flow meters, water quality sensors, and GPS units) because existing equipment is used by graduate students on funded research projects, and this has left unfunded graduate students and undergraduates with a limited supply of equipment to conduct exploratory research needed to develop research proposals or to conduct undergraduate research that is typically unfunded.

The equipment that Angel has requested will specifically benefit the research programs of SEFS faculty who focus on freshwater systems, including Dr. David Butman, Dr. Susan Bolton, Dr. Daniel Vogt, and myself. Sharing equipment among the students and faculty in the above labs will foster collaboration and increase opportunities to develop joint proposals to build the capacity in SEFS for freshwater research as was intended with the recent hire of Dr. David Butman through the UW Freshwater Initiative (http://coenv.washington.edu/research/major-initiatives/freshwater/). Furthermore, the equipment requested by Angel will be shared with students and faculty in the School of Public Health and can be share with the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (SAFS) to promote collaboration across campus.

I am excited about the potential for expanding the technological toolbox for hydrological instruments available to students and faculty in SEFS, and I'm really pleased that Angel brought her ideas for this proposal to my attention.

Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions about value of this equipment for use by students in SEFS and throughout the College of the Environment.

Sincerely,

Christian Torgersen, PhD
Research Landscape Ecologist and Affiliate Assistant Professor
U.S. Geological Survey
Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center
Cascadia Field Station
University of Washington
School of Environmental and Forest Sciences
Box 352100
Seattle, WA 98195-2100
phone: 206-616-1874 fax: 541-750-1069
ctorgersen@usgs.gov
http://fresc.usgs.gov/staff/profile.asp?Emp_ID=378

Installation Timeline

New equipment will be ordered as soon as funding is received and will be available for student use before the Fall quarter 2015.

Resources Provided by Department

Each laboratory will provide maintenance and minor consumables (paper, batteries) for all equipment that it maintains. SEFS IT staff members will conduct the initial software install and hardware setup of the Cepheid unit.

Access Restrictions (if any)

The Microbiological laboratory (Health Sciences F066) is available for drop in for the hours from 8am-5pm Monday-Friday for information. Laboratory work time slots can be reserved during the week (M-F) by dropping in or via email to the lab manager. The check-out of field equipment can be set-up via email directly to Dr. Butman (dbutman@uw.edu).

Student Endorsements

Dear STF committee,

Statement of Support for STF Grant Funding:

I am writing to voice my strong support for the critical equipment that all aquatic ecologists require for basic stream sampling and analysis. I want to stress how central the availability of field equipment has been to my field work. My research objective is to determine the biogeography of microbial diversity in streams and the relationship between the beta diversity among each location with the level, distribution, and persistence of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains across the entire watershed. This work requires that samples be carefully collected, transported appropriately, and processed as quickly as possible for the most reliable snapshot of community composition at that moment in time. The water quality metrics gathered during sampling must be easy to collect and completely accurate as they cannot be gathered at a later time or estimated in the lab to be considered reliable explanatory factors as my work is highly contextually dependent. In addition, the integrity and completeness of my data determine the microbiological lab methods I can use and the statistical methods appropriate for the analysis.

Last year in the field many times my equipment failed or data was lost from memory or was not recorded properly within the aging units. I was not able to locate field equipment in SEFS and borrowed GPS and Rangerfinders from the Centers for Demography and Ecology. Although very helpful in their lending policy they do limit the time that a student can keep the equipment to one week.

When field equipment is unavailable, is inferior, or measurement accuracy poor the equipment effectively constrains the research objectives; a sort of “Liebig’s Law of the Minimum” for field equipment. Currently there are no water quality tools available at SEFS. Therefore the addition of the high-precision Sonde probe and other hydrological tools will allow the fast collection of the highest precision water quality data.

The Cepheid GeneXpert is a completely closed system that is simple, rapid, and accurate for performing active surveillance of pathogens in the environment. It is completely self-contained and represents a paradigm shift in genomic analysis of environmental samples. This is the only system that combines on-board sample preparation with real-time PCR amplification and detection of targeted nucleic acid sequences directly from unprocessed samples. The system removes the expensive and time-consuming aspects of DNA extraction and removes the risk of contamination. In clinical trials the system performed as well as every other manual method and is therefore a cost effective and efficient way to detect specific signature sequences from samples.

The contamination of our environment with antibiotic resistant “gene pollution” from industrial agriculture, waste-water treatment, and stormwater runoff is a world-wide problem that results in millions of deaths every year and immeasurable negative environmental impacts. It is the compromises to ecological function in streams that is the core of my research objectives and in concert with the Fresh Water Initiative goals will serve to effectively monitor our precious water resources.

Sincerely,

Angela M. Klock, M-GIS, M.Sc.
PhD Student
Landscape and River Ecology Lab
School of Environmental and Forest Sciences
University of Washington
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Dear STF Review Committee Members,

I am in full support of this STF grant proposal. We, as scientists, are aware that new technologies always benefit not only ourselves but will advance our field in the future. I strongly believe purchasing the field equipment and the GeneX PCR system will facilitate better water data collection, improve the quality of our research, give more opportunities to undergraduate students, and encourage students to stay with their field of research interest for longer. Students who have worked in our lab tend to remain longer in specific research areas if the equipment is up-to-date and works well. These individuals also tend to contribute more over time which supports the University of Washington's leading status as a top-notch research facility in the area of environmental antibiotic resistance.

I am especially in full support of purchasing GeneX system for joint use between SEFS and the School of Public Health. There are currently no such units available in the School of Public Health that I am aware of and my research is centered around this particular process. I have noticed that equipment like this is in very high demand and is always insatiable. This often leaves undergraduate students with very limited access to this essential component for environmental monitoring research projects. This machine will aid several critical research projects in my lab as well as assisting me directly. My research ongoing right now is to quantify the risk of exposure to pathogenic bacteria in the University hospital laundry facility that is serviced mostly by low income and non-english speaking employees.
---
Karen Michael, MPH
PhD Candidate | Environmental and Occupational Hygiene
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences
School of Public Health | University of Washington | Seattle, WA
Box 357234 | HSB F066 | Seattle, WA | USA 98195-7234
770-843-1636 | kem82@uw.edu

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Dear STF Review Committee Members,

I want to express how important the Cepheid GeneXpert is going to be for the course of the Marilyn Roberts Laboratory research endeavors. Currently our protocols to detect antibiotic resistant pathogenic bacteria like Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) takes about a week from sampling to verification. With the Cepheid GeneXpert system, we will be able to obtain our results in a one hour period. With rapid identification, we will be able to quickly pinpoint sources of infection within the environment and determine how widespread the antibiotic resistant pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, we will be able to craft strategies to minimize the risks of infection quicker than before. The Cepheid GeneXpert will not only be a boon to the Marilyn Roberts Laboratory, the system will rapidly advance progress in public health in addressing the escalation of antibiotic resistant pathogenic bacteria and allow for the rapid detection in critical environments such as streams and places with frequent human contact.

Sincerely,

David No
Research Scientist
Marilyn Roberts Laboratory
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences
University of Washington
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Dear STF Review Committee Members,

As a current master's and continuing PhD student in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences studying conservation ecology, I fully support this proposal to purchase water quality testing equipment. Measuring soil quality, watershed morphometry and hydrology, water physiochemistry, and microbial community structure are vital components for soil and water quality research, and also for human health and the health of our ecosystems and wildlife. I especially support this proposal and would personally use this equipment if purchased because it will help conserve habitat in response to rapid land-use change. The equipment is also accessible, portable and reusable, which is essential to maximize student use at the University. I endorse the purchase of all related equipment and believe it will enable necessary research and benefit the UW community as a whole for years to come.

Samantha Zwicker
Master's Student
School of Environmental and Forest Sciences
University of Washington
szwicker@uw.edu
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Dear STF Review Committee Members,

My name is Danielle Bogardus and I am currently an undergraduate student at the University of Washington in the Program on the Environment. My specific interests lie in sustainable community development and upon reading this proposal I was very excited. The relationship between terrestrial and the riverine systems is crucial to the overall health of an area, especially as communities are developing. I have felt that as a student I have limited availability to the equipment needed to pursue my current research endeavors, a project with a non-profit where I hope to pursue both water and soil sampling. Providing the equipment for easy check-out will allow the development of not only communal projects within the UW, but research projects that undergraduates undertake for their senior capstone for example, which is crucial for personal and educational growth within our majors!

Danielle Bogardus
Undergraduate Student
Program on the Environment
University of Washington
dbogardus4@gmail.com

Items

Group Funded Item Unit price Quantity Subtotal
Water Quality Field Instrument

YSI Sonde

$6,490.00 2 $12,980.00
Description

EXO2 Sonde, 100 meter depth, 6 sensor ports, 1 wiper port
https://www.ysi.com/EXO2?EXO2-Water-Quality-Sonde-90
Xylem quote 4/15/15

Justification

The Sonde EXO2 is a very sophisticated water physicochemical sampling device for oceanographic, estuarine, or surface water applications. It is very easy to use and has multiple sensors in one small package. It has on-board memory and wireless communication. Easy integration into marine, estuarine, freshwater and ground water monitoring systems. You can configure with different sensors in minutes. SEFS does note have any YSI devices for students.

EXO Conductivity/Temp Sensor

$860.00 2 $1,720.00
Description

EXO Conductivity/Temperature Sensor, Ti
- Compatible with any EXO sonde
- new flow channel design and high accuracy temperature
- Incorporates wet-mate connector and welded titanium housing

Justification

Sensor for YSI Sonde

EXO ISE02 pH Sensor Assembly

$560.00 2 $1,120.00
Description

EXO ISE02 pH Sensor Assembly, Unguarded, Ti
- Patented user replaceable sensor head
- Incorporates wet-mate connector and welded titanium
housing

Justification

pH Sensor Assembly for Sonde

EXO Optical DO Sensor

$1,960.00 2 $3,920.00
Description

EXO Optical DO Sensor

Justification

Optical DO Sensor for Sonde

EXO Turbidity Sensor

$1,800.00 2 $3,600.00
Description

EXO Turbidity Sensor

Justification

Turbidity Sensor for Sonde

Total Algae - PE Sensor

$3,380.00 2 $6,760.00
Description

EXO Total Algae - PE Sensor

Justification

EXO Total Algae - PE Sensor for Sonde

EXO fDOM Sensor

$2,130.00 2 $4,260.00
Description

EXO fDOM Sensor

Justification

EXO fDOM Sensor for Sonde

EXO Central Wiper

$1,110.00 2 $2,220.00
Description

EXO Central Wiper

Justification

EXO Central Wiper for Sonde

EXO Signal Output Adaptor

$395.00 2 $790.00
Description

EXO Signal Output Adaptor

Justification

EXO Signal Output Adaptor for Sonde

EXO 4-m Field Cable

$520.00 1 $520.00
Description

EXO 10-m Field Cable

Justification

EXO 10-m Field Cable for Sonde

EXO 10-m Field Cable

$595.00 1 $595.00
Description

EXO 10-m Field Cable
- Connects sonde to EXO Handheld Display or USB adaptor
- wet mate connectors and strain relief

Justification

EXO 10-m Field Cable
- Connects sonde to EXO Handheld Display or USB adaptor
- wet mate connectors and strain relief

Environmental Monitoring

FH950 Portable Flow Meter

$6,056.00 1 $6,056.00
Description

FH950 Portable Flow Meter Velocity & Depth System w/20ft cable
http://www.hachflow.com/flow-meters/fh950.cfm

Justification

SEFS has no flow meters available for students

Flow Probe

$943.00 1 $943.00
Description

FP111 Flow Probe w/3.7 to 6 ft handle, carrying case

Justification

SEFS has no general use flow meters.

Garmin GPS Map 64st

$350.00 2 $700.00
Description

Garmin GPS Map 64st
garmin.com

Justification

SEFS has no newer functional GPS units for student check out.

Laser Technology TruPulse 200 Rangefinder

$795.00 2 $1,590.00
Description

Laser Technology TruPulse 200 Rangefinder

Justification

SEFS has no rangefinders for student use

Ricoh WG-4 Underwater camera

$295.00 2 $590.00
Description

Ricoh WG-4 Underwater camera

Justification

SEFS has no underwater cameras

Cepheid GeneXpert System IV

$40,545.00 1 $40,545.00
Description

GeneXpert IV, 2 Testing Site System w/ 6 Color Modules, Laptop Computer & Dx 4.3 Software, Dx
Quote April 22, 2015 from Cepheid.com Michael Bell

Justification

This is a stand alone, fully integrated and automated on-demand molecular diagnostic system.
The GeneXpert Dx System automates and integrates sample preparation, nucleic acid amplification, and detection of the target sequence in simple or complex samples using real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The system is suited for in vitro diagnostic and research based applications that require hands-off processing of samples and provides both summarized and detailed test results data in tabular and graphic formats.

There is no comparable unit on campus that allows students to quickly and efficiently process environmental samples without specialized laboratory skills of DNA extraction, isolation, and PCR amplification to acquire results. This would be the first available system that would allow students to process a sample in 90 minutes start to finish.

Pelican Box for GX4

$1,000.00 1 $1,000.00
Description

TD (Transportable Device or Pelican Box) available for GX2 & GX4 configurations

Justification

TD (Transportable Device or Pelican Box) for GX4. This systems is fully contained to hold the laptop and GeneX for mobility and use in the field.

Shipping and Tax

Sales Tax

$8,650.00 1 $8,650.00
Description

Sales tax add on

Justification

Sales tax at 9.6% for Seattle

Shipping Costs

$500.00 1 $500.00
Description

Shipping cost estimate

Justification

Shipping costs anticipated for all items requested.

Total requested: $99,059.00

Total funded: $0.00

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