Proposal

Introduction

Proposal ID 2015-064
Submitted April 21, 2015
Owner krhodson
Department Earth and Space Sciences
Category Machinery & Research
Funding Status Fully Funded
Metric Score 3.59

Contacts

Primary
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Katharine Huntington
  • Associate Professor
  • kate1@uw.edu
  • 206-543-1750
  • Box 351310
Budget
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Sue Bernhardt
  • Administrator
  • suejoi@uw.edu
  • 206-543-0384
  • Box 351310
Dean
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Lisa Graumlich
  • Dean of the College of the Environment
  • envdean@uw.edu
  • 206-221-0908
  • Box 355355

Descriptions

Abstract

Abstract -
The cathodo-luminescence (CL) microscopy system in the Earth and Space Sciences Dept. is a valuable, well used instrument with broad applications in the earth sciences, as well as biology and ocean sciences. In its current configuration, the CL system cannot be utilized to its full potential due to the limitations of the associated microscope, which can only provide a single magnification power (5x). Current and future research using the CL system will be hindered if the microscope is not upgraded, as the use of higher magnifications is standard across most optical microscopy applications. This proposal requests funding for a new microscope for the CL system with the right specifications and specialized optics for CL analyses. By improving this equipment numerous student research projects will benefit directly, but additional benefits will be realized in the forms of teaching and student exposure in the classroom and attention for the UW garnered through the use of a high-end device available only at select institutions.

Category Justification

Category Justification -
Machinery and Research is the clear choice for this proposal. The proposal requests established, "tried-and-true" equipment that will be used to upgrade an existing instrument, and will be a stationary in a dedicated lab room. Therefore, Machinery and Research is the only reasonable category choice.

Background

Background -
The University of Washington's position as a tier-one research institution is built upon its ability to foster diverse, high quality research, which depends on access to high quality equipment and research tools. Student researchers depend on access to well functioning equipment to maintain the rigor of their scientific pursuits, and are severely hindered when supplemental equipment and accessories for scientific instruments are not adequate. The cathodo-luminescence (CL) microscopy system in the Earth and Space Sciences Department is an excellent example of an instrument that is limited by inadequate peripheral equipment. The CL has been a central element of numerous PhD and Masters projects, is routinely used by students, and will continue to be an important tool for ongoing and future research. Replacement of key components, namely the attached microscope system, will greatly expand the base functionality of the CL system, directly effecting student research in multiple departments.

In CL analysis, a focused beam of electrons stimulates a sample specimen, which then emits visible light (luminescence) of variable brightness and color depending on its chemical composition. The pattern of the luminescence reveals aspects of the sample that are not observable using other microscopic techniques. These properties are of interest to many facets of the geologic and earth sciences, including: petrology, structural geology, carbonate mineralogy, marine geology, oceanography, sedimentology and economic geology. The CL microscopy system consists of two major parts: 1) The CL system, including a high voltage power supply, vacuum system, and electron gun; and 2) a microscope to view samples during analysis. The CL system is a research-grade piece of equipment, and functions well, producing consistent, high-quality results. The microscope currently available for the CL, however, is not designed to work with the CL system, diminishing its functionality and hindering the quality of CL analyses.

The CL system is a extremely powerful, yet fairly uncommon, tool for describing the chemistry of rock and mineral samples. If paired with a microscope with the proper specifications, our CL device would produce extremely high quality data for research and clear, sharp images for publication. Unfortunately, the current microscope is not able to accommodate the size and optical requirements of the CL, preventing the use of magnifications higher than 5x (the lowest currently available) or properly aligning the microscope optics. Both of these problems are actively affecting research results. Lack of magnifications higher than 5x is problematic for observing the small features in a sample, which can be invaluable for research investigating the micro-scale properties of rocks, minerals and fossils. Aligning the lenses of the microscope is critical to producing the high quality images.

If funded, the new microscope would feature the needed clearances and dimensions and include specially chosen lenses and objectives, tailoring it specifically for use with the CL system. This will accommodate all the needs of the CL system, while providing space and flexibility for future modifications. The microscope we have chosen is a used Nikon Optiphot-2 system, which is ideal due to uncommonly large clearances between the upper an lower arms. In fact, no new instrument could be identified that met the requirements for the CL. High-end microscopes are designed to last indefinitely when properly cared for, so the acquisition of used microscope equipment from a reputable dealer often gives excellent value for the cost. Many of the components quoted are discounted 35 to 40% from MSRP, and can be expected to perform at virtually the same level as an equivalent new part. The high-quality, versatile microscope requested in this proposal will bring the CL microscopy system to its full potential, promoting active and future research in the natural sciences at UW.

Benefits to Students and the University

Benefits to the Students and the University -
The improved microscope for the Cathodo-luminescence (CL) microscopy system will be directly beneficial as a research tool for students in the Earth and Space Sciences Department studying a range of geologic disciplines. Students in other departments interested in natural and artificial material characterization, such as Ocean Sciences, Archeology, Forestry, and Materials Sciences will likely benefit as well. Clearly, the improvement of this equipment will raise the level of research at UW, especially within a department with a reputation for research excellence, recently rated as the 5th best Earth Science department in the country. The CL system is frequently used by ~5 or more graduate student researchers in the Earth and Space Sciences Department, and this is expected to increase with the added appeal of the requested equipment. Ongoing collaborations with professors in the Ocean Sciences Department are likely to attract new students from outside Earth and Space Sciences interested in bio-mineralization and marine geology. The improved equipment will also be an exceptional instructional tool for classes at the undergraduate and graduate level. Courses such as sedimentary petrology, mineralogy, economic geology and igneous petrology will all benefit from the availability of a fully functioning CL microscope, potentially affecting scores of students annually.

Petrographic and geochemical skills attained through the use of the CL microscopy system are directly applicable to many careers in the Earth Sciences spanning the academic, energy, resource, and government sectors. Access and exposure to this equipment for research and instruction better prepares them for jobs after receiving a degree from the UW.

Since the CL is a relatively uncommon piece of equipment, bringing it to its full capability would raise outside interest in research at UW. This is beneficial to students not just because of added prestige for the university, but also by forging new collaborations with outside students and faculty interested in CL analysis. Research published using the improved CL microscopy system will generate this interest, potentially making us a regional center for CL microscopy.

The Student Technology Fund has recognized the importance of the CL microscopy system before, funding a research-grade camera system, computer and software for the existing microscope That camera would be compatible with the new microscope. Improving the microscope would provide a return on this earlier STF investment, allowing users to achieve the full potential of the imaging equipment as well as the CL system.

Departmental Endorsements

Departmental Endorsements -

I would like to express my strong support for this proposal to purchase a specialized microscope for use with the cathodoluminescence (CL) equipment housed in the Department of Earth and Space Sciences. When the CL equipment was obtained in 2012, it was installed on a microscope that was donated by the ESS department from its existing resources. Although the donated microscope did not have sufficiently large working distance between the objective lenses and the stage to be able to use any but the lowest (5x) magnification, the hope was that it would provide adequate functionality for research and teaching. The current CL system has proven to be a valuable tool for multiple lab groups and research directions across campus, and is critical to the cutting-edge carbonate geochemistry research performed by my students and myself. However, as currently outfitted, the microscope for the CL provides only the most basic magnification functionality, limiting research applications and making it impossible to integrate data from complementary microscopy techniques. Considering the important role the CL has obtained within the department even with its current limitations, upgrading the microscope will clearly advance the range of applications for the CL system as well as the quality of analyses and research. The increased magnifications this proposal provides would bring the equipment up to the same power as other commonly used microscopy techniques, allowing high-resolution CL observations to be fully integrated with the other research tools at our disposal.

Large investments have already been made into this system by faculty in ESS and Biology and by the ESS department, and the STF proposal demonstrates the broad need for data from the CL microscope. The proposed microscope would greatly improve current CL research, and would ensure the CL instrument provides the functionality needed to accommodate future research needs.

Katharine Huntington
Associate Professor, Department of Earth and Space Sciences
-----------------------------------------------

Cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy is a primary tool for characterizing natural and engineered materials, including inorganic minerals, biominerals, and ceramics. In ESS, optical-CL microscopy is used to describe the nature of calcium carbonate minerals in fossils and precipitated in fractures in rock. This characterization is an essential first step before advanced isotopic analyses -- and without it, the isotope data are not meaningful. We have been hobbling along with a donated CL and a re-purposed microscope, but a new microscope would substantially improve ease of use and range of applications, opening opportunities for more students, both in CL and in the isotopic tools for which the CL is a prerequisite. These techniques have already found application at UW for student research in the study of ancient faults, the growth and preservation of fossils, in understanding paleoenvironments, and investigation of geothermal energy resources. As use of the CL instrument has increased, ESS has provided a new, dedicated workspace. An improved microscope could transform this tool from its “duct-tape and bailing-wire” state to a state-of-the art resource.

Juliet Crider
Assistant Professor, Department of Earth and Space Sciences
-----------------------------------------------

One of the most useful tools in the study of sedimentary rocks (particularly for the carbonates) is cathodoluminescence microscopy. As a sedimentary petrologist who usually works with carbonates and evaporites I find it very useful to employ such equipment in following the alteration history of these sediments, most particularly in the tracing of the formative stages of various cements and vein fillings. However our cathodoluminascope, particularly configured for the current microscope on which our equipment is mounted, only permits 5 times magnification. This low power is enough to hint at the rock history but does not deliver the 10-20X magnification routinely used in the Earth Sciences, particularly important when bringing our findings to publication in papers and conference presentations. The light microscope on which our CL equipment is mounted does not have this higher power utility in a functional form as there is no capacity for the use of higher power objectives with the CL stage in place. Our proposal is for an improved microscope, which would allow us to generate the high quality data used in the professional field of research.

Sincerely yours,

B. Charlotte Schreiber
Affiliate Professor of Geology
-----------------------------------------------

In early 2011, I found out that the ConocoPhillips Technology Center had a Relion cathodoluminescence unit that they were interested in making surplus. ConocoPhillips donated the unit to our department, and we were able to repair and upgrade various parts—for example, the pump—at Relion.

Two of our graduate students, Gabe Casale, a Ph.D. that I was supervising, and Sarah Bergman, a Master’s student Professor Kate Huntington supervised, immediately used the unit in their research on carbonate veins and rocks. The CL instrument is especially useful for ongoing research by students and faculty on carbonate veins. Only CL reveals the temporal sequence of carbonate—knowledge that is essential for our in-house lab work on clumped isotopes.

However, the microscope we have been using with the CL units has always been a stop-gap. One of the main difficulties is that we can only use a 5X objective. All petrographic work involves using 10 and 20X objectives.

Our cathodoluminescence unit is one of the most important in our array of petrographic equipment. I support without reservation the proposal to purchase a new microscope dedicated to the instrument.

Darrel Cowan
Professor, Department of Earth and Space Sciences
-----------------------------------------------

I write in support of the proposal presented by ESS students to STF for the funds necessary to expand the capabilities of the department’s existing cathodoluminescence (CL) microscope beyond its present 5x magnification. This advancement will benefit students and faculty in ESS, Biology, Oceanography and other departments by providing a more nuanced view of structures that is often required for robust results. It will be of particular use to my advisees and myself for assessing diagenesis in the ancient carbonate shells and skeletons we employ for paleoclimatic reconstructions. Even fine scale alteration may affect the trace metal and isotope-based paleoclimate proxies we measure in such carbonates and finer resolution CL imaging will ensure we limit our analyses to only the most pristine specimens available. The proposed augmentation of the existing CL facility would be a great asset to UW students and faculty for many years to come and should be a high priority for funding.

Casey Saenger
Research Scientist
Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO)
-----------------------------------------------

The recent addition of new research techniques to the ESS department in the form of cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy equipment has opened up important areas of research for students and faculty, including myself. This new equipment allows me and other researchers to investigate new questions in the field of geochemistry and diagenesis, and provides students with hands-on experience in high-tech microscopy. Unfortunately, the light microscope that this new CL equipment is currently attached to does not allow for publication-quality images or data, so all of our work at present can serve only as “preliminary results”. With the upgrading of the microscope equipment as this proposal suggests, we would then be able to generate the high-quality data that many lab groups within the department rely on for assessing geochemical compositions and demonstrating sample physical properties, which is a crucial part of many isotope and geochemistry-based projects and resulting publications generated by ESS researchers. Improved microscope resources would greatly increase the productivity and efficiency of many in IsoLab and beyond!

Ethan Hyland
Postdoctoral Fellow (Earth and Space Sciences)
-----------------------------------------------

Stable isotope geochemistry relies heavily on mass spectrometers to provide a signal and instruments like the CL microscope to provide students and faculty with context of how to interpret their signal. A fully functional CL microscope will greatly help students and faculty of IsoLab interpret their stable isotope data.

Andrew Schauer
Research Scientist and IsoLab Manager

Installation Timeline

Installation Timeline -
If funded, the proposed equipment can be ordered immediately, and installed upon arrival. A permanent lab space has been designated for the CL system, and minor renovations to the room have already been initiated.

Resources Provided by Department

Resources Provided by the Department -
While the Department cannot cover the cost of the new equipment, faculty and departmental funds are available to cover its periodic maintenance and upkeep, which are low frequency and low cost.

Despite exceeding the $10,000 cut-off, insurance is not believed to be necessary for this equipment. It is a stationary unit kept in a key-controlled room in the Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysics building. Microscopes are designed to last indefinitely, and careful training of new users will mitigate non-routine repairs. The microscope can be expected to operate without major refurbishment or repair for decades. Thus, potential for theft and accidental breakage will be minimized, precluding the necessity of an insurance policy.

Access Restrictions (if any)

Access Restrictions -
The microscope will be accessible to all University of Washington undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and staff as well as members of other institutions if arrangements are made. All new users will need to receive a short training session from a student or faculty member familiar with the device. The CL microscope system will be located in a key-controlled lab space in the Atmospheric Sciences-Geophysics Building. Users will need to acquire a key from the department office or borrow a key from a more frequent user.

Student Endorsements

Student Endorsements -

I offer my full support for this proposal to improve the imaging capabilities of the cathodoluminescent (CL) scope. I am a PhD student, and I study how carbonates can act as a proxy for temperatures in the past by using clumped isotopes. It is crucial for my work that I can identify carbonates that are pristine, i.e., have not been altered by heat and presssure as they are buried. CL is the most effective and simplest way to identify alteration in samples. New research has emerged that shows that it is possible for sediments to be deeply buried and only slightly altered, such that the proxy measurement that I make might seem reasonable, but does not in fact guarantee that my sample is pristine (Shenton et al., 2015, Passey & Henkes 2012). This research makes it even more important that myself and other carbonate geologists can examine the minerals under CL scope to ensure that they are pristine. In addition to using CL to check for alteration, I anticipate using the CL scope to examine cross-cutting relationships and textures to understand relative ages of the different types of carbonate. It is extremely important that I can zoom in to fine scales to see detail in my samples, so that I can confidently sub-sample the pristine parts of the carbonate. The capabilities to zoom into a sample is not state of the art, but rather state of the practice. It is crucial that I am able to examine my samples in detail in order to confidently present my proxy results. I anticipate relying on the CL scope throughout my PhD research. Additionally, this equipment will be important for anyone who wants to measure clumped isotopes at UW. We have a full-functioning carbonate clumped isotope laboratory, except the important omission of a functioning, zooming microscope to use with our CL. I hope that the Student Techonology Fund committee will fund this proposal for a microscope for the CL in order to facilitate research of ancient climate and carbonate proxies at UW.

Julia Kelson
PhD Student,
IsoLab & Department of Earth and Space Sciences
-----------------------------------------------

As a graduate student in the Earth and Space Sciences Department, my work is dedicated to understanding how fault zones and fracture networks influence the flow of fluids through the earth’s crust. One of my methods invokes the chemistry of minerals within the fault zones to inform the timing, conditions of fluid transport, as well as the fluid source. The cathode-luminescence (CL) microscope is crucial to these efforts, as it provides a view into the mineral preservation and formation history that is not attainable using any other methods in the department. While the current CL setup has provided excellent, first-pass results, future advances will be limited by the inability to adjust the magnifications. Many of the features I investigate can be much smaller than what is observable under the current 5x objective. Hence, the continued advancement of my work is dependent on the acquisition of a more powerful microscope for the CL. Other users in Earth and Space, Biology, and Oceans Sciences will clearly benefit from the expansion of this instrument’s capabilities as well. For these reasons, I strongly support the funding of this proposal.

Keith Hodson
Graduate Student, Earth and Space Sciences Dept.
-----------------------------------------------

I am writing in support of the Student Technology Fund proposal for a higher-quality petrographic microscope that will be used with our cathodoluminescence. I am a fourth year volcanology PhD student and my research project includes analysis of Hawaiian lava samples for evidence of magma mixing. Crystals growing in magma record changes in the magmatic environment in the form of zoning patterns, similar to tree-rings. Having access to a new petrographic microscope combined with cathodoluminescence would allow me to determine which minerals are zoned and therefore represent changing magmatic environments. These zoning patterns can occur at very small spatial scales (~micrometers), and the current magnification capabilities of the microscope may not be high enough to resolve these patterns. A new petrographic microscope would be useful for students in our department, since it provides researchers a fast and inexpensive way to identify minerals in samples, especially when combined with the cathodoluminescence capabilities we already have.

-- Jillian Schleicher, Graduate Student, Department of Earth and Space Sciences
-----------------------------------------------

Microscopes are one of the most widely used tools in scientific research and education as they allow us to look directly at things that are far too small to view with the naked eye. In addition to making things appear bigger, microscopes also increase the amount of detail, or resolution, that we can see. The ability to change magnification and thus study science at different scales is not only essential for research to progress, but it also makes microscopes applicable to a wide variety of scientific studies. Currently, the inability of our cathodoluminescence microscope to change magnifications hinders the microscope from being fully functional and useful as a research tool. It also limits the number of researchers, faculty, and students that may want to use it. I fully support the acquisition of a new microscope that is better suited for our current cathodoluminescence set-up and I strongly urge the committee to consider this proposal. By funding this you will not only be helping to support current and innovative research at the University of Washington, but you as well will be furthering the mission statement of the school by keeping this institution at the forefront of research and technology.

Kelly Hillbun
Graduate student
Earth & Space Sciences and Astrobiology
-----------------------------------------------

I’m writing you in the interest of securing funds for a petrographic microscope compatible with our current cathodoluminescent (CL) system in the department of Earth and Space Sciences. As a second year graduate student who studies rock formation and variation in magmatic systems, CL allows for observational benefits that help to enhance areas of my current research.
The age and chemistry of magmatic systems are often preserved within the chemistry of precipitating crystal phases within a magma. As these crystals grow, they form rings which record changes in the magma composition. Such changes are indicative of both internal and external processes. CL imaging on a new microscope would allow me to efficiently identify these growth rings. Additionally, CL assists in locating and identifying particular minerals to be used for chemical analyses or age dating.
In short, I strongly support this proposal for a new microscope capable of increased magnification of CL imagery. Improvement to the current CL system will be a significant benefit to both current and future research within this department.

Sincerely,

John Fullmer
Graduate Student, Earth and Space Sciences

Items

Group Funded Item Unit price Quantity Subtotal
a

Nikon Optiphot 2 stand

$1,909.20 1 $1,909.20
Description

84200 - Nikon Optiphot 2 Stand

Microscope stand sized to accommodate the CL system components. Used Component.

Justification

Microscope stand (body) to support other microscope components.

Widefield Trinocular Tube

$1,059.50 1 $1,059.50
Description

MBB63300 - Widefield TI-ER trinocular tube, 100% vis or 86 % phot -14% vis.

This part directs light from the sample to either the oculars (eyepieces) or to the camera for imagine acquisition. It is an integral part of a microscope system. Used Component.

Justification

Essential component for microscope functionality. Directs light to the viewer from the objectives.

10x Focusable Eyepiece

$113.40 1 $113.40
Description

84220 - CFWN 10x WF focusable eyepiece.

This is a standard 10x eyepiece (ocular). It provides the ability to finely focus the image, allowing the two separate eyepieces to be in focus at the same time. This is particularly important for accommodating people with glasses. Used Component.

Justification

This is the component that the user looks into and allows for focusing the eyepieces relative to each other.

10x focusable eyepiece w/ crossline reticle and scale

$349.00 1 $349.00
Description

84268 - CFWN 10x WF CM focusable eyepiece w/ crossline reticle and scale.

10x magnification eyepiece capable of fine focusing. Included reticle and scale allow the user to make measurements through the eyepieces of the microscope.

Justification

This component is necessary for the microscope function. The reticle feature is standard on most microscopes and allows measurements to be made through the eyepieces.

Camera Mount Adapter

$568.10 1 $568.10
Description

MQD42060 - C-mount adapter 0.60x.

This component allows the high-resolution digital camera system currently on the CL to be used with the new microscope. Used Component.

Justification

Required for use of existing camera and imaging equipment (funded by prior STF grant).

Microscope Stage

$499.80 1 $499.80
Description

79275 - Ceramic rectangular mechanical stage.

The stage is the platform that supports the sample or accessories attached to the microscope. This stage will provide a solid base for the CL system attached to the microscope. Used Component.

Justification

Stage is required for the mounting of the CL system on the microscope.

Stage Micrometer

$142.00 1 $142.00
Description

KR-812 - Klarmann Rulings stage micrometer (25 mm., 0.2, 0.10 & 1.0 mm.).

Precise, fine-scale ruler that is viewed under the microscope to calibrate distances on the camera images and the eyepiece reticle.

Justification

Required for calibration of image scale for camera and eyepiece reticle for oculars.

5-place Revolving Nosepiece

$237.60 1 $237.60
Description

79019 - 5-place revolving nosepiece.

Allows up to 5 objectives to be mounted to the microscope body and easily switched between. Used Component.

Justification

Required for attachment of microscope objective to camera body.

5x Microscope Objective

$422.50 1 $422.50
Description

MUL00050 - CF Plan Epi 5x/0.13 objective, w.d. 22.5 mm.

Low-magnification objective with 22.5 mm working distance, compatible with CL system requirements.

Justification

Basic 5x objective for low-magnification observation.

10x Microscope Objective

$1,375.00 1 $1,375.00
Description

MUL04100 - CF SLWD Plan Epi 10x/0.40 BF objective, w.d. 20.3 mm.

This 10x objective has a "super-long" working distance of 20.3 mm, nearly ten times as long as standard 10x objectives. It is compatible with the requirements of the CL system.

Justification

This component is required to achieve 10x magnifications with the CL system.

20x Microscope Objective

$1,350.70 1 $1,350.70
Description

MUL04200 - CF SLWD Plan Epi 20x//0.35 BF objective, w.d. 20.5 mm.

This 20x objective has a "super-long" working distance of 20.5 mm, more than ten times as long as standard 20x objectives. It is compatible with the requirements of the CL system. Used Component.

Justification

This component is required to achieve 20x magnifications with the CL system.

Microscope Condenser

$476.45 1 $476.45
Description

MBL16100 - Long working distance Achromatic condenser 0.65 NA.

This component conditions transmitted light (from below) before it illuminates the sample, resulting in higher quality imaging. It is a standard component on all transmitted light microscopes. This model is compatible with the specialized objectives requested in the proposal. Used Component.

Justification

Required for proper sample illumination using a transmitted light source.

Diascopic Filter Polarizer

$49.80 1 $49.80
Description

79159 - Diascopic filter polarizer for condenser mounting

Polarizes transmitted light before entering the condenser. Necessary for crossed-polar observations and standard on all petrographic microscopes used in the earth sciences. This can be used in place of the rotatable polarizer if additional space and clearance is needed. Used Component.

Justification

Required component for crossed-polar observations, which are critical for CL analysis. This type of observation provides necessary context for the CL analyses.

Illuminator

$894.40 1 $894.40
Description

MBE62200 - Universal epi-illuminator 10.

This directs transmitted light up from the base of the microscope through the CL stage and sample. Used Component.

Justification

Crucial component of any transmitted light microscope. Provides light source from below sample.

Brightfield Module

$239.85 1 $239.85
Description

MBE62010 - Brightfield module.

Accommodates microscope attachments needed for making brightfield-type observations, which involve full use of incomming light from the illuminator. Used Component.

Justification

Required for proper light management from sample up through the eyepieces or camera.

Rotatable Polarizer

$406.25 1 $406.25
Description

MBN65920 - Epi-polarizer, rotatable.

Polarizes transmitted light before entering the condenser. Necessary for crossed-polar observations and standard on all petrographic microscopes used in the earth sciences. This can be used interchangeably with the filter polarizer, but contains superior optical quality in exchange for a larger physical size. Used Component.

Justification

Required component for crossed-polar observations, which are critical for CL analysis. This type of observation provides necessary context for the CL analyses.

Full Wave Plate

$232.05 1 $232.05
Description

MBN65922 First order red compensator, full wave plate.

When in place, this accessory shifts the spectra by a precise amount, adding color to minerals based on their optical properties. This is particularly useful for identifying mineral phases such as carbonate, which are common targets on the CL. Used Component.

Justification

Incredibly useful accessory facilitating sample characterization during crossed-polar observations.

Lamphouse Adapter

$338.00 1 $338.00
Description

MBE65090 - Lamphouse adapter for 100 watt QH lamp.

This component allows attachment of the quoted lamphouse (illumination source) to the microscope body.

Justification

Required for attachment of lamp for light source.

Lamp Power Supply

$282.75 1 $282.75
Description

MBF12232 - Power supply for 50/100 watt halogen lamps.

Power source for lamp used to illuminate samples in microscope. Used Component.

Justification

Provides power to lamphouses for microscope illumination.

Lamphouse - Reflected Light

$237.60 1 $237.60
Description

84230 - Lamphouse-2 and socket for 12 volt, 100 watt QH (Reflected).

Light source during reflected light observations, where light is emitted from above and reflects off the sample into the eyepieces or camera. Used Component.

Justification

Provides light during reflected light microscopy.

Lamphouse - Transmitted Light

$237.60 1 $237.60
Description

84230 - Lamphouse-2 and socket for 12 volt, 100 watt QH (Transmitted).

Provides light source during transmitted light observations, where light passes through the sample up into the eyepieces or camera. Used Component.

Justification

Required for transmitted light observations.

100W Halogen Bulb

$15.00 2 $30.00
Description

84125 - 12 volt, 100 watt quartz halogen bulb.

These light bulbs provide wide spectrum, consistent light for use with the included lamphouses.

Justification

Light bulbs for lamphouses.

Lamphouse Power Cord

$7.20 2 $14.40
Description

79035 - Power cord.

Power cords for lamphouses. Used Component.

Justification

Provides power to lamphouses from power source.

Analyzer Module

$1,903.00 1 $1,903.00
Description

MDB45305 - P-I intermediate tube with rotating analyzer & compensator slot.

Allows a polarized lens to be placed above the sample during transmitted light analysis, "crossing" the polarizers. This is a basic function for petrographic microscopes, and is necessary for determining the context of CL results within a sample. This model allows the polarizing lens to be rotated, revealing additional optical properties of minerals and tailoring image contrast.

Justification

Required for crossed-polarizer analysis of transmitted light.

0.25 and First-Order Wave Plate

$793.00 1 $793.00
Description

MDV40300 - P-CL ¼ wave and first order red tint plate, 3 position.

Accessory plate containing mineral lenses for modifying the appearance of mineral specimens. Useful for characterizing the context of CL observations.

Justification

Required accessory for analyzer module. Provides additional tools for mineral identification.

b

Tax

$1,359.55 1 $1,359.55
Description

Justification

9.6% sales/use tax.

c

Shipping

$65.00 1 $65.00
Description

FedEx 3-Day shipment cost.

Justification

Total requested: $15,586.50

Total funded: $15,586.50

Group Funded Item Change in Unit price Change in Quantity Change in Subtotal
Maching Costs

Supplemental 1

$300.00 1 $300.00
Description

The needed machining is minimal. We need to tap 2 holes into the new microscope stage so that we can attach the mounting plate for the cathodoluminescence vacuum chamber. The cost associated with this will be almost entirely labor associated with making the holes. Because it is a labor cost, the specific amount cannot be quoted before the work is done, but a preliminary estimate from the Physics Machine Shop indicated that the price will certainly not exceed $300.

Justification

Simple machining of the new microscope stage is required to mount the cathodoluminescence attachment to the microscope. Without these modifications, the new microscope cannot hold the instrument it was purchased for. We saved $1359.55 during purchasing by achieving tax-exempt status, easily offsetting the nominal cost of machining (listed amount is maximum expected cost).

Supplemental request: $300.00

Deicision: Funded

Group Funded Item Unit price Quantity Subtotal
a

Nikon Optiphot 2 stand

$1,909.20 1 $1,909.20
Description

84200 - Nikon Optiphot 2 Stand

Microscope stand sized to accommodate the CL system components. Used Component.

Justification

Microscope stand (body) to support other microscope components.

Widefield Trinocular Tube

$1,059.50 1 $1,059.50
Description

MBB63300 - Widefield TI-ER trinocular tube, 100% vis or 86 % phot -14% vis.

This part directs light from the sample to either the oculars (eyepieces) or to the camera for imagine acquisition. It is an integral part of a microscope system. Used Component.

Justification

Essential component for microscope functionality. Directs light to the viewer from the objectives.

10x Focusable Eyepiece

$113.40 1 $113.40
Description

84220 - CFWN 10x WF focusable eyepiece.

This is a standard 10x eyepiece (ocular). It provides the ability to finely focus the image, allowing the two separate eyepieces to be in focus at the same time. This is particularly important for accommodating people with glasses. Used Component.

Justification

This is the component that the user looks into and allows for focusing the eyepieces relative to each other.

10x focusable eyepiece w/ crossline reticle and scale

$349.00 1 $349.00
Description

84268 - CFWN 10x WF CM focusable eyepiece w/ crossline reticle and scale.

10x magnification eyepiece capable of fine focusing. Included reticle and scale allow the user to make measurements through the eyepieces of the microscope.

Justification

This component is necessary for the microscope function. The reticle feature is standard on most microscopes and allows measurements to be made through the eyepieces.

Camera Mount Adapter

$568.10 1 $568.10
Description

MQD42060 - C-mount adapter 0.60x.

This component allows the high-resolution digital camera system currently on the CL to be used with the new microscope. Used Component.

Justification

Required for use of existing camera and imaging equipment (funded by prior STF grant).

Microscope Stage

$499.80 1 $499.80
Description

79275 - Ceramic rectangular mechanical stage.

The stage is the platform that supports the sample or accessories attached to the microscope. This stage will provide a solid base for the CL system attached to the microscope. Used Component.

Justification

Stage is required for the mounting of the CL system on the microscope.

Stage Micrometer

$142.00 1 $142.00
Description

KR-812 - Klarmann Rulings stage micrometer (25 mm., 0.2, 0.10 & 1.0 mm.).

Precise, fine-scale ruler that is viewed under the microscope to calibrate distances on the camera images and the eyepiece reticle.

Justification

Required for calibration of image scale for camera and eyepiece reticle for oculars.

5-place Revolving Nosepiece

$237.60 1 $237.60
Description

79019 - 5-place revolving nosepiece.

Allows up to 5 objectives to be mounted to the microscope body and easily switched between. Used Component.

Justification

Required for attachment of microscope objective to camera body.

5x Microscope Objective

$422.50 1 $422.50
Description

MUL00050 - CF Plan Epi 5x/0.13 objective, w.d. 22.5 mm.

Low-magnification objective with 22.5 mm working distance, compatible with CL system requirements.

Justification

Basic 5x objective for low-magnification observation.

10x Microscope Objective

$1,375.00 1 $1,375.00
Description

MUL04100 - CF SLWD Plan Epi 10x/0.40 BF objective, w.d. 20.3 mm.

This 10x objective has a "super-long" working distance of 20.3 mm, nearly ten times as long as standard 10x objectives. It is compatible with the requirements of the CL system.

Justification

This component is required to achieve 10x magnifications with the CL system.

20x Microscope Objective

$1,350.70 1 $1,350.70
Description

MUL04200 - CF SLWD Plan Epi 20x//0.35 BF objective, w.d. 20.5 mm.

This 20x objective has a "super-long" working distance of 20.5 mm, more than ten times as long as standard 20x objectives. It is compatible with the requirements of the CL system. Used Component.

Justification

This component is required to achieve 20x magnifications with the CL system.

Microscope Condenser

$476.45 1 $476.45
Description

MBL16100 - Long working distance Achromatic condenser 0.65 NA.

This component conditions transmitted light (from below) before it illuminates the sample, resulting in higher quality imaging. It is a standard component on all transmitted light microscopes. This model is compatible with the specialized objectives requested in the proposal. Used Component.

Justification

Required for proper sample illumination using a transmitted light source.

Diascopic Filter Polarizer

$49.80 1 $49.80
Description

79159 - Diascopic filter polarizer for condenser mounting

Polarizes transmitted light before entering the condenser. Necessary for crossed-polar observations and standard on all petrographic microscopes used in the earth sciences. This can be used in place of the rotatable polarizer if additional space and clearance is needed. Used Component.

Justification

Required component for crossed-polar observations, which are critical for CL analysis. This type of observation provides necessary context for the CL analyses.

Illuminator

$894.40 1 $894.40
Description

MBE62200 - Universal epi-illuminator 10.

This directs transmitted light up from the base of the microscope through the CL stage and sample. Used Component.

Justification

Crucial component of any transmitted light microscope. Provides light source from below sample.

Brightfield Module

$239.85 1 $239.85
Description

MBE62010 - Brightfield module.

Accommodates microscope attachments needed for making brightfield-type observations, which involve full use of incomming light from the illuminator. Used Component.

Justification

Required for proper light management from sample up through the eyepieces or camera.

Rotatable Polarizer

$406.25 1 $406.25
Description

MBN65920 - Epi-polarizer, rotatable.

Polarizes transmitted light before entering the condenser. Necessary for crossed-polar observations and standard on all petrographic microscopes used in the earth sciences. This can be used interchangeably with the filter polarizer, but contains superior optical quality in exchange for a larger physical size. Used Component.

Justification

Required component for crossed-polar observations, which are critical for CL analysis. This type of observation provides necessary context for the CL analyses.

Full Wave Plate

$232.05 1 $232.05
Description

MBN65922 First order red compensator, full wave plate.

When in place, this accessory shifts the spectra by a precise amount, adding color to minerals based on their optical properties. This is particularly useful for identifying mineral phases such as carbonate, which are common targets on the CL. Used Component.

Justification

Incredibly useful accessory facilitating sample characterization during crossed-polar observations.

Lamphouse Adapter

$338.00 1 $338.00
Description

MBE65090 - Lamphouse adapter for 100 watt QH lamp.

This component allows attachment of the quoted lamphouse (illumination source) to the microscope body.

Justification

Required for attachment of lamp for light source.

Lamp Power Supply

$282.75 1 $282.75
Description

MBF12232 - Power supply for 50/100 watt halogen lamps.

Power source for lamp used to illuminate samples in microscope. Used Component.

Justification

Provides power to lamphouses for microscope illumination.

Lamphouse - Reflected Light

$237.60 1 $237.60
Description

84230 - Lamphouse-2 and socket for 12 volt, 100 watt QH (Reflected).

Light source during reflected light observations, where light is emitted from above and reflects off the sample into the eyepieces or camera. Used Component.

Justification

Provides light during reflected light microscopy.

Lamphouse - Transmitted Light

$237.60 1 $237.60
Description

84230 - Lamphouse-2 and socket for 12 volt, 100 watt QH (Transmitted).

Provides light source during transmitted light observations, where light passes through the sample up into the eyepieces or camera. Used Component.

Justification

Required for transmitted light observations.

100W Halogen Bulb

$15.00 2 $30.00
Description

84125 - 12 volt, 100 watt quartz halogen bulb.

These light bulbs provide wide spectrum, consistent light for use with the included lamphouses.

Justification

Light bulbs for lamphouses.

Lamphouse Power Cord

$7.20 2 $14.40
Description

79035 - Power cord.

Power cords for lamphouses. Used Component.

Justification

Provides power to lamphouses from power source.

Analyzer Module

$1,903.00 1 $1,903.00
Description

MDB45305 - P-I intermediate tube with rotating analyzer & compensator slot.

Allows a polarized lens to be placed above the sample during transmitted light analysis, "crossing" the polarizers. This is a basic function for petrographic microscopes, and is necessary for determining the context of CL results within a sample. This model allows the polarizing lens to be rotated, revealing additional optical properties of minerals and tailoring image contrast.

Justification

Required for crossed-polarizer analysis of transmitted light.

0.25 and First-Order Wave Plate

$793.00 1 $793.00
Description

MDV40300 - P-CL ¼ wave and first order red tint plate, 3 position.

Accessory plate containing mineral lenses for modifying the appearance of mineral specimens. Useful for characterizing the context of CL observations.

Justification

Required accessory for analyzer module. Provides additional tools for mineral identification.

b

Tax

$1,359.55 1 $1,359.55
Description

Justification

9.6% sales/use tax.

c

Shipping

$65.00 1 $65.00
Description

FedEx 3-Day shipment cost.

Justification

Maching Costs

Supplemental 1

$300.00 1 $300.00
Description

The needed machining is minimal. We need to tap 2 holes into the new microscope stage so that we can attach the mounting plate for the cathodoluminescence vacuum chamber. The cost associated with this will be almost entirely labor associated with making the holes. Because it is a labor cost, the specific amount cannot be quoted before the work is done, but a preliminary estimate from the Physics Machine Shop indicated that the price will certainly not exceed $300.

Justification

Simple machining of the new microscope stage is required to mount the cathodoluminescence attachment to the microscope. Without these modifications, the new microscope cannot hold the instrument it was purchased for. We saved $1359.55 during purchasing by achieving tax-exempt status, easily offsetting the nominal cost of machining (listed amount is maximum expected cost).

Overall total funded: $15,886.50

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