Proposal

No annual report

Introduction

Proposal ID 2015-052
Submitted January 16, 2015
Owner tuesday
Department Materials Science and Engineering, Department of
Category Machinery & Research
Funding Status Fully Funded
Metric Score 3.83

Contacts

Primary
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Tuesday Kuykendall
  • MSE Lab Manager
  • tuesday@uw.edu
  • 206-221-2678
  • Box 352120
Budget
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Jay Montague
  • Assistant to the Chair
  • montague@uw.edu
  • 206-543-2615
  • Box 352120
Dean
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Michael Bragg
  • Dean of Engineering
  • mbragg@uw.edu
  • 206-543-1829
  • Box 352180

Descriptions

Abstract

X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer – Machinery and Research
The Materials Science & Engineering and Anthropology departments propose the acquisition of an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Spectrometer, XRF calibration standards and a XRF sample preparation station. As with the other instruments in our facility, the utility of this instrument crosses many disciplines. It is an invaluable complement to other characterization instruments and is used to identify elements. This non-destructive tool can be used in Materials Sciences, Earth Sciences, Anthropology and Archeology. For example, XRF is used to analyze ancient coins, paint pigments in art, and ancient glasses. In materials science, XRF is used to identify elemental composition of materials and can be utilized in quality control and contamination identification. XRF is a fundamental tool that is commonly used in industry and research and complements other tools like X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The MSE Lab Manager will support this instrument and students will receive one-on-one instruction before gaining access to the instrument independently.

Category Justification

This instrument falls under the "Machinery and Research" Category. It is designed for scientific research into elemental analysis of materials. This instrument will advance student scholarship and enhance university and departmental stature..

Background

As previous STF proposals demonstrate, the Materials Science and Engineering and the Anthropology departments have collaborated on past funding projects (2011-090-1 and 2014-004) to bring valuable, research quality instrumentation to our undergraduate community. Last year we added a SEM that includes Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) (2014-004). EDS is a great tool for elemental analysis of small volumes of materials when under high vacuum. A natural complement to the EDS tool is XRF. The difference between these two methods is the range of elements they are able to detect, the sample preparation and vacuum environment and the range of types of materials. XRF is a better method for bulk materials and materials of varied size and shape In addition, the SEM’s primary function is imaging and the EDS is a secondary function whereas the XRF instrument would be dedicated to elemental analysis.

X-Ray Fluorescence is a method in which the elements (and their ratios) of a material are identified. When energetic x-rays strike atoms in a material the energy from the x-ray allows for a transition on the atomic scale that in turn releases an energy (or wavelength) that is unique to each element. The intensity of the wavelength tells us something about the relative concentration of that element within the area irradiated and this method is sensitive to trace amounts. This makes XRF a very useful tool for quantifying elements in a material.

Benefits to Students and the University

Undergraduate and graduate students alike have an opportunity to access instrumentation to support their research and classwork. A brief review of literature indicates that XRF is used in a wide range of disciplines including Chemistry, Biomedical and Life Sciences, as well as those mentioned above. UW researchers use some XRF in their labs but there does not appear to be a general access lab that includes this valuable resource. In addition, until recently, non-destructive, high spatial resolution micro-XRF analysis, was possible only at specialized Synchrotron radiation facilities, which we don't have convenient access to at UW.

XRF data would support students who include SEM results in their papers submitted to peer review publications or for their own projects. Students who have experience operating XRF in addition to SEM will have stronger job applications. Up to 200 students per year should benefit from this resource based on the evaluation of benefit of the overall MSE facility. The MSE facility serves students from every engineering discipline as well as many from Anthropology, Physics, and Earth Sciences. Whenever a new resource becomes available in our facility we notify our students and invite them to come up with their own ideas and innovations for projects that use the resource and many times we will suggest projects if students are unsure of how to proceed. As with many of our instruments, once students become aware of the availability and functionality of a resource its use increases.

To ensure the quality of data gained from the XRF calibration standards are vital. A full standards library expands the variety of materials that can be evaluated and ensures continuous monitoring of the instruments compliance.

While this instrument is very versatile in the materials and sample types, some samples require processing and being able to create good, uncontaminated pellets is important. For this reason, a specialized pellet press is also proposed.

The MSE Department is dedicated to providing students access to research quality instrumentation. The MSE Lab Manager maintains a catalyst page that describes the resources available and how to proceed with training and access. The MSE lab manager and/or the MSE Lab Assistant provide students with one on one training on the instruments in the MSE User facility (and other department resources). When a student demonstrates proficiency on the instrument access to the lab is provided via a coded lock. Students can reserve these resources online through the department resource scheduler from any computer. These instruments are available to students in the evenings and on weekends as well as during regular business hours.

Departmental Endorsements

Alex Jen
Boeing-Johnson Chair Professor
Chair, MSE

I would like to provide my strongest support for your STF proposal on acquiring a new X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Spectrometer. I agree with your statement in the benefits section - this instrument will provide our undergraduate and graduate students the urgently needed access to support their research and classwork. UW researchers use XRF in their labs but students do not have a general access for this valuable resource. The ability to get valuable XRF data would support students in their papers submitted to peer review publications or for their own projects. Students who have experience with XRF will have stronger job applications.

We as a department will provide the needed resources and part of your time to support the general access of this instrumentation to ensure this facility serves students from every engineering discipline as well as many from Anthropology, Physics, and Earth Sciences.

I wish you good luck in your proposal application.

January 9, 2015
From: Janelle S. Taylor
Chair, Department of Anthropology

I write to endorse the STF proposal to purchase a bench-top XRF machine and expand
our inventory of calibration standards. This equipment will enhance the ability of undergraduate and graduate students in anthropology to conduct compositional analysis, particularly useful for analyzing the composition of archaeological and bio-anthropological materials. The new equipment will complement existing technology, and significantly expand the range of scales at which such analyses can be conducted. Undergraduate students enrolled in the Archaeological Sciences option will particularly benefit. Equipment that allows us to provide students with experience using up-to-date equipment to perform data-collection will significantly enhance their education, and advance our ability to prepare them for future employment relevant to their training. The Anthropology department has close relations with the Materials Science and Engineering Department, and faculty and students in Anthropology have benefitted greatly from access to STF-funded facilities in MSE. Therefore, I support this request.

Fumio Ohuchi
MSE -Professor & Associate Chair

"I strongly support your proposal to use the STF fund to further develop our undergraduate teaching laboratory into a more coherent and integrated facility. Addition of "x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy" to the current scanning electron microscopy facility that was purchased by 2014 STF fund would further increase the range of analysis capability, thus the students can gain tremendous knowledge from it. This facility, if funded, will be jointly used with other department, which helps students to explore a wide range of topics. Your effort will help our department strives to become a leader in the nation in educational innovation at the undergraduate level. I endorse this with my highest enthusiasm."

Installation Timeline

The instrument will be installed and operational within two weeks of delivery.

Resources Provided by Department

The XRF will be located in Mueller 167 next to the JEOL SEM (2014-004). As with all of the STF Fund instrumentation in the MSE user center, the department will support and maintain the instrument and students will have primary access. If consumables are necessary, the department will provide them for undergraduate students. Graduate students are charged for consumables if they have a budget though their research units. Consumables mean specialized sample holders or sample preparation tools that are not supplied with the instrument. Consumables for instrument maintenance are not charged to students. The MSE department allows NON-UW users to use these instruments on a limited basis for a fee and the departments fiscal office allocates these funds to support and maintain the instrument.

Access Restrictions (if any)

Students gain access to the instrument after one-on-one training and a competency test.

Student Endorsements

Jack Johnson -- PhD student in Anthropology, Manager of Archaeology Curation Services at the Burke Museum
"The requested equipment will be a major asset for UW students in both archaeology and museology. For archaeology students, this equipment will facilitate hands-on experience with a range of techniques which are currently standard practice in the discipline, including applications in characterization, identification, and sourcing of an array of archaeological materials such as ceramics, tool stone, and sediments. For museology students, this equipment will facilitate hands-on experience with techniques useful for the authentication and/or preservation of artwork and artifacts. Students who gain these skills will have major advantages in pursuing independent research, advanced studies, and careers in archaeology and/or museum studies, and this equipment is therefore exactly the type of resource we should be cultivating at UW. I strongly support this proposal."

Aaron Lichtner – MSE PhD Studnet
“I did my bachelor's degree in a medium size university in the relatively unknown Materials Engineering department. Even in undergrad (5 years ago) we had access to an XRF machine. I found it to be a highly useful and versatile tool which ended up being invaluable to my own research. It's always been strange for me that at such a well-regarded university that we don't have access as students to what some would call "basic materials characterization techniques". An XRF, such as the one being proposed under this STF proposal, would not only benefit a few researchers in our department but could be used interdepartmentally to forge collaborations and expand the capabilities of the materials science department.”

Nicholas Robinson – MSE Undergrad Student
"As an undergraduate student in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering, I fully support the proposal to obtain an X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer for this department and the Department of Anthropology. This instrument would provide unique materials characterizing capabilities and valuable learning opportunities for the students of these departments. For students majoring in MSE, the spectrometer would provide additional materials characterization opportunities for the Junior Laboratory series, and directly complement our core courses including Crystallography and Structure (MSE 331) and Materials Characterization (MSE 333). MSE, Anthropology, and other departments may use this spectrometer to enhance research endeavors requiring materials identification. An X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer would benefit the departments of MSE and Anthropology and many students."

Ariane Erickson – MSE PhD Student
“I am a current PhD student in the Materials Science and Engineering department and I highly support the addition of an X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (XRF) to the department as it would greatly improve the collective quality of research. For my research, XRF would be key in detecting the trace amount of composite nanoparticles in our polymer nanofibers. Coupled with the crystallographic information from XRD, the XRF would highly improve the impact of our publications, while also giving our undergraduate students a chance to learn an industrially widely used instrument.”

Brian Tran – MSE Undergrad Student
I support and endorse the department's XRF STF proposal. I think it would be a facility that complements the existing facilities, and could also be helpful for interdisciplinary use for work in other relevant fields.

Sean Tavakoli – MSE Undergrad Student
“I completely support this proposal. I believe that having an X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer would be valuable and useful for the Department of Materials Science & Engineering at the University of Washington.”

Adriana Raybould – MSE Undergrad Student
“I believe acquiring these XRF machines would greatly benefit both the students and staff at the University of Washington. These machines allow us to utilize powerful material characterization techniques. Techniques like this are the backbone of material characterization and, ultimately, lead to a richer subject knowledge.”

Daniel Elworth – MSE Undergrad Student
One aspect of my senior research project is the characterization of tungsten oxide deposited by a TIG welder. Due to the air environment that the reaction takes place it is possible that contaminates, such as tungsten/ammonium complexes, are being produced as well. An XRF would be a helpful counterpart to the MSE undergraduate XRD to identify any undesired compounds.

Kirsten Allen – MSE Undergrad Student
As a materials science undergrad, I fully support this proposal. It would be very advantageous to have this equipment for elemental composition detection, as it is an important element of a large percent of the research and lab projects I've been involved in during my time in this department. Our department doesn't have an XRF right now, and bringing one in would provide a new characterization method for those whose research would be benefited by XRF specifically, and would provide an additional tool for general composition analysis that is also needed due to a shortage of equipment given the large number of students.

Erica Robinson – Engineering Undergrad Student
“I endorse the proposal to purchase the new EDXRF spectrometer. It looks like an excellent, easy-to-use machine with low cost of ownership and high reliability and durability, even under normally unfavorable conditions, and it will complement and enhance the other machines currently available in Mueller by providing a new type of analysis that can help confirm or deny other findings without being redundant or overlapping much in purpose. This spectrometer will also provide an alternative to similar machines on campus, improving wait times and alleviating scheduling issues because the tools in Mueller are intended to be accessible to all students. An EDXRF spectrometer would be a very exciting addition to our resources.”

Items

Group Funded Item Unit price Quantity Subtotal
1

X-Ray Fluorescence

$93,000.00 1 $93,000.00
Description

Bruker S2 Ranger (or comparable instrument) X-ray Fluorescence

Justification

This is the main instrument and includes all items necessary to operate the instrument. Price includes shipping.

2

Sample Prep station and Standards

$11,000.00 1 $11,000.00
Description

Pellet press and die and Elemental standards,

Justification

Sample preparation station for students to produce quality samples and standards for elemental calibration.

3

Tax

$9,880.00 1 $9,880.00
Description

Washington State Tax (estimated)

Justification

Total requested: $113,880.00

Total funded: $113,880.00

Group Funded Item Change in Unit price Change in Quantity Change in Subtotal
None

Upgraded Instrument

$82,500.00 1 $82,500.00
Description

From Manufacturer: M4 Tornado is an energy dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectrometer for position sensitive elemental analysis for all elements with atomic number from 11 (Sodium). The instrument is designed for analyzing a wide range of samples beginning with large inhomogeneous specimens down to the smallest particles.
The high spatial resolution is made possible by the system’s

Justification

To purchase an instrument that has greater capacity and sensitivity. The new instrument has a much larger chamber that will allow users to analyze items without having to compromise them - for example, a intact pottery artifact.

Supplemental request: $82,500.00

Decision: Not funded

Group Funded Item Change in Unit price Change in Quantity Change in Subtotal
None

Upgraded Instrument_2

$44,000.00 1 $44,000.00
Description

From Manufacturer: M4 Tornado is an energy dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectrometer for position sensitive elemental analysis for all elements with atomic number from 11 (Sodium). The instrument is designed for analyzing a wide range of samples beginning with large inhomogeneous specimens down to the smallest particles.

Justification

To purchase an instrument that has greater capacity and sensitivity. The new instrument has a much larger chamber that will allow users to analyze items without having to compromise them - for example, a intact pottery artifact.

Supplemental request: $44,000.00

Deicision: Funded

Group Funded Item Unit price Quantity Subtotal
1

X-Ray Fluorescence

$93,000.00 1 $93,000.00
Description

Bruker S2 Ranger (or comparable instrument) X-ray Fluorescence

Justification

This is the main instrument and includes all items necessary to operate the instrument. Price includes shipping.

2

Sample Prep station and Standards

$11,000.00 1 $11,000.00
Description

Pellet press and die and Elemental standards,

Justification

Sample preparation station for students to produce quality samples and standards for elemental calibration.

3

Tax

$9,880.00 1 $9,880.00
Description

Washington State Tax (estimated)

Justification

None

Upgraded Instrument_2

$44,000.00 1 $44,000.00
Description

From Manufacturer: M4 Tornado is an energy dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectrometer for position sensitive elemental analysis for all elements with atomic number from 11 (Sodium). The instrument is designed for analyzing a wide range of samples beginning with large inhomogeneous specimens down to the smallest particles.

Justification

To purchase an instrument that has greater capacity and sensitivity. The new instrument has a much larger chamber that will allow users to analyze items without having to compromise them - for example, a intact pottery artifact.

Overall total funded: $157,880.00

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