Proposal

No annual report

Introduction

Proposal ID 2015-048
Submitted January 16, 2015
Owner mortensd
Department Physics
Category Machinery & Research
Funding Status Not Funded
Metric Score 3.68

Contacts

Primary
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Gerald Seidler
  • Professor
  • seidler@uw.edu
  • 206-616-8746
  • Box 351560
Budget
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Jennifer Raines
  • Administrator
  • jraines@uw.edu
  • 616-9652
  • Box 351560
Dean
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Ron Kline
  • Director of Computing
  • arkline@uw.edu
  • 543-6366
  • Box 35375

Descriptions

Abstract

Electrical energy storage, i.e., ‘battery’, research is a critical piece of contemporary research in science and technology that can have immense social impact, such as in more cost-effective and better-performing electric cars and in more effective electrical energy storage to aid with incorporation of renewable energy into the distribution grid. At the UW, electrical energy storage is being actively studied by numerous students in Physics, Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, Materials Science, and Chemical Engineering. Here, we propose to broadly aid their experimental research progress, while also creating truly novel educational opportunities in clean energy, by the purchase of a commercial turnkey system for rapid, on-site assembly and basic testing of novel battery systems. The resulting system would become part of the new battery preparation and testing user facility being supported by the UW’s Clean Energy Institute, thus ensuring the broadest access to UW students while also providing long-term support and maintenance.

Category Justification

This equipment will be used to produce working battery cells out of novel electrode materials developed at the University of Washington. Hence, we select “Machinery and Research”.

Background

Improved battery technology has, for many years, been declared by the US Department of Energy to be one of the most important technological goals for any successful transition to a renewable energy society (see: http://science.energy.gov/bes/news-and-resources/reports/abstracts/#EES ). The challenges are manifest and no one battery technology will serve all applications. For example, for electric cars, which probably have the most demanding standards, the most important metrics are low-weight, high-storage capability, and good long-term durability, while for grid-integration problems the dominant issues are scalability to very high total energy storage and extreme durability.

Last academic year, the University of Washington launched the UW Clean Energy Institute (CEI, see http://www.cei.washington.edu/ ). The CEI’s state-mandated mission is to improve solar energy utilization, electrical energy storage technology, and integration of the electrical grid with renewable energy resources. In addition to other efforts, in its first year+ of existence the CEI has invested about $3M of internal funds to improve the on-site research infrastructure in these fields, including especially the renovations and initial instrumenting of several labs in the ground floor of the MolES building that will serve as the site for CEI-supported user facilities hosting cutting-edge capabilities in clean energy research. A user facility is an open, technician-supported entity whose target users are centrally the graduate and undergraduate students at the UW.

For the purpose of the present proposal, the most important user facilities are the new battery preparation and testing user facility (BPT-UF, being organized by Prof. Venkat Subramanian of UW Chemical Engineering) and the CEI’s unique x-ray absorption near structure spectrometer (CEI-XANES, under the guidance of Prof. Gerald Seidler of UW Physics). The BPT-UF will serve the students in numerous research groups on campus (Chem, Phys, Mat Sci, Chem Eng, Electrical Eng, among others) and the students in several courses (Chem Eng, Mat Sci) by providing a central, technically-supported environment in which to make and finely interrogate research-quality batteries having novel chemical composition and electrode design. The BPT-UF, when combined with CEI-XANES, for example, will be the world’s only facility dedicated to performing long-baseline x-ray spectroscopic characterization of batteries. This is a big deal. X-ray spectroscopies provide an exceptionally fine characterization of how battery chemistry changes on the atomic scale as you charge and discharge the battery, and that is among the most important information needed for improved battery electrode design. The successful combination of BPT-UF and CEI-XANES toward this goal will help to push UW and the CEI further into the national forefront of battery research.

However, there is a problem that we seek to address with the aid of STF funding. Presently, the UW battery research groups and the equipment planned for the BPT-UF only includes the oldest, simplest approach to model-battery preparation: the so-called coin-cell method. Unfortunately, the coin-cell prep in the research lab environment is unsuitable for many long-baseline studies (that are critically needed to understand how long a particular battery chemistry will survive on charging and discharging many times) and are also challenging to make compatible with advanced x-ray methods, such as with CEI-XANES. Instead, a much improved sample preparation technology has been developed by researchers in industry and national labs, the “pouch cell battery”. Compared to coin cells, pouch cells have a longer cycle life, degrade slower, offer more flexibility in battery design, and are better suited for advanced, analytic techniques. For all these reasons, pouch cells have become the standard at major battery research hubs such as Argonne National Laboratories in addition to being used in many real-world applications, such as in cell phones.

Upgrading the combined BPT-UF and CEI-XANES facilities with the pouch cell technology will immediately position every student in battery-research at the UW to have a competitive edge over essentially all other universities. Furthermore, for instruction in chemical engineering and materials science and engineering (where upper-division and graduate-level courses address electrical energy storage chemistry, preparation, and applications), the addition of pouch-cell technology to the BPT-UF will make UW one of the rare universities whose students receive hands-on state-of-the-art training in battery manufacture. This fact can only assist with both the transition to research and also with employment opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

[Note that although tax is calculated in the Items section, this machinery (minus consumables) should fall under the Machinery and Equipment exemption to the sales tax.]

Benefits to Students and the University

The addition of a pouch cell production line will greatly enhance the capability of battery research at the UW. In addition to rapid prototyping and testing of innovative battery designs, this system will enhance the effectiveness of existing infrastructure within the CEI user facilities, as described in the background, above. In particular, the soon-to-be-commissioned CEI-XANES instrument is well-suited to probe the internal chemistry of working battery pouch cells. Measurements of these types are currently only possible at large scale, access-limited synchrotron facilities run by the US Department of Energy and the ability to perform x-ray spectroscopic studies on-site gives the UW a unique research advantage. Furthermore, the ability to make and test battery pouch-cells as part of the UW educational experience in Chemical Engineering and in Materials Science and Engineering will bring state-of-the-commercial-art capability into instruction. This enhanced preparation, which is uncommon (if not truly rare!) at other universities will help prepare those UW students with a competitive edge for employment in the renewable energy sector.

We now estimate the total student impact of the acquisition of the ‘pouch cell factory’:

Graduate and Undergraduate level research: Several major research groups on campus are strongly involved in the experimental aspects of electrical energy storage, including Subramanian (Chem Eng), Cao (Mat Sci), Yang (Mat Sci), and Seidler (Physics), and many other groups have occasional projects in this field. Based on recent discussions with CEI faculty, we estimate that 15 current UW graduate students are immediately involved in the experimental (rather than simulation or grid-integration) side of battery research and could benefit from the proposed turnkey pouch cell factory. As this apparatus should have a 10-yr plus lifetime, it is fair to estimate that ~50 UW graduate students would benefit from the proposed capability for their research. Those same research groups have a total of about 5 undergraduates involved in hands-on battery research each year. As the research-duration of undergraduate involvement is more usually about 1 year, this means that about 50 undergraduates would benefit from access to the pouch-cell factory during its expected lifetime. Adding these, we estimate that approximately 100 UW students would receive research-involvement benefit.

Instruction: Both Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering teach courses having a significant component on electrical energy storage. The annual combined enrollment of these classes is ~40 students. The access to the BPT-UF through the CEI’s support of instruction in clean energy technology means that many of these students would have the opportunity to be trained in the pouch-cell prep and use it in their course projects. As not every student in those courses would likely have such a project, we conservatively estimate that another 100 students would accrue benefit from the new equipment over its ten-year lifetime.

Departmental Endorsements

To whom it may concern,

It is my pleasure to give my strongest endorsement of the proposal by UW Physics grad students Devon Mortensen and Alex Ditter to acquire and commission an advanced battery preparation and testing system for use by students at the University of Washington, especially those actively involved in battery research in Physics, Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Chemical Engineering.

I understand and appreciate that the UW Clean Energy Institute (CEI) will serve as the de factor host department for the requested apparatus as part of the CEI's new battery fabrication and advanced testing facility. This arrangement will both ensure the long-term maintenance of the new equipment and will also help to ensure that easiest access and best training for UW students.

Sincerely Yours,
Blayne Heckel
Chair, Physics Department
----------
Dear STFC Committee,

I am delighted to write to you with my strongest support for the proposal to bring an exceptionally powerful and versatile pouch cell battery fabrication tool to the UW community. This new fabrication tool will bring unparalleled reproducibility and reliability to the process of rechargeable battery fabrication for research and educational purposes here at the University of Washington. My research group in the UW Chemistry Department is heavily invested in developing advanced materials and novel surface chemistry approaches for longer-life and higher capacity rechargeable batteries. We strive to verify the impact of our chemical modifications through extensive battery electrochemical analysis, so we live and die by reliability. This new pouch cell fabrication tool will undoubtedly yield a great benefit for our group. Moreover, in our search for advanced materials design concepts, we are also concerned with the nature of the chemical interactions that occur on the molecular level within our devices, so the new avenue that this pouch cell approach will open in terms of x-ray analysis could potentially be a game-changing development for our group. The bottom line is that this new battery fabrication tool will undeniably enable here at UW an entirely new and multifaceted level of research and education, focused on the next generation of electrochemical energy storage devices. I hope that you will be as excited about the future prospects of bringing this great capability to our student researchers as I am. Thank you for your consideration and kindest regards.

Sincerely,
Cody W. Schlenker, PhD
WRF Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Clean Energy
National Science Foundation Fellow

Department of Chemistry
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195-1700
----------
Dear STF committee,

It is my pleasure to strongly endorse the proposal by Devon Mortensen and Alex Ditter to acquire the turn-key pouch cell fabrication and testing system from MTI corp. The addition of this capability to the UW will have a major impact on battery research, not the least by making it easy to make x-ray compatible batteries for study using advanced x-ray methods, such as is the specialty of my group.

As the formal supervisor on this project, I accept responsibility for overseeing the acquisition and installation and commissioning of the requested system, which would immediately become part of a battery prep and advanced testing user facility run by the UW Clean Energy Institute.

Sincerely,

GT Seidler
----------
To whom it may concern,

On behalf of the UW Clean Energy Institute (CEI), which would effectively serve as the host Institute for the 'battery pouch cell' fabrication system, it is my pleasure to give my strongest support to this proposal. Battery fatigue is a major technical problem that impedes, for example, cost reduction in the operation of electric vehicles. The ability to make state-of-the-art, long-life batteries at the UW having novel materials chemistry will be a major step forward for battery research at the UW and will also provide an important educational enrichment via student projects in select upper-division and graduate-level courses in Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering.

The CEI will provide space and technical support for the pouch cell factory as a component in a new battery preparation and testing facility being organized by Prof. Venkat Subramanian of the department of Chemical Engineering. Prof. Seidler of the Physics department will oversee the initial acquisition and installation of the system, in addition to establishing guidelines for the preparation of x-ray compatible batteries for UW students to use in the CEI-XANES spectrometer.

The system will be professionally maintained and user training will be made available free of charge. Access will be provided to qualified graduate and undergraduate students who are actively involved in battery research or education upon the request of their research supervisor or advanced course instructor. As per the STF program guidelines, consumables will be supplied for all UW students without charge.

SIncerely,

Alex Jen
Boeing-Johnson Chair Professor
Chief Scientist
Clean Energy Institute
Chair, Department of Materials Science & Engineering
----------
I fully support the acquisition of the "pouch cell factory". This medium format cell ( as compared to our normal small coin cell) offers (currently unavailable) opportunities of investigating many challenges in Li-ion battery technology development, including in-situ XAFS and XANES, structural and redox variation/stability upon electrochemical cycling, battery degradation mechanisms, etc. All of my three graduate students and 2 undergraduate students would benefit from this acquisition.

In fact, a new project in my group that studies the intercalation behavior (rechargibility) of Zn-ion battery would have the benefit of acquiring previously non-existing data.

In short, I strongly support this.

Best,

Jihui Yang
Kyocera Associate Professor
Materials Science and Engineering Department
University of Washington
315 Roberts Hall, Box 352120
Seattle, WA 98195-2120
----------
I would like to add my support to this proposal. Typically coin cells are studied in the labs across the country for understanding the performance limitations of lithium-ion batteries. Typically coin cells last only few hundreds of cycles while in industries I have seen 60,000+ cycles. The ability to make pouch cells will help my group understand the cycle life limitations of graded electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

Teaching:
I am teaching a new course titled "Battery Systems Engineering". I expect to have 20+ students in this course (both UG and graduate, cheme and EE). This machine will help show a demonstration for this course.

Thanks
Venkat Subramanian
Washington Research Foundation Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and Clean Energy
University of Washington
----------
I am writing to tell you how excited I am to hear you are pursuing a facility to fabricate batteries. I have an ever increasing number of students in Chemical Engineering coming to me asking for more opportunities to get involved in battery science and engineering. The Chemical Engineering Innovation Program I created and teach is a partnership with the Foster Business school, and it gets undergraduate and grad students working together in interdisciplinary teams to develop an innovative product and plan for moving that product from the lab to the market. It is having a huge impact in ChemE, and the proposed turn-key battery fabrication facility you propose will be an extraordinary new way for students to turn ideas into innovaitons. In terms of raw numbers, about 25% of the ChemE senior cohort and 25% of each ChemE Ph.D. cohort work together on research, and then product design. We give the undergrads credit for this as an alternative to a class-room oriented capstone project. The facilities you are proposing are turn key, so it will let students get trained quickly and start build batteries for their undergraduate and graduate projects. I am super excited, both a a ChemE teacher and as Director of the Clean Energy Institute, where we will host and maintain this facility for the broad campus benefit.

Best,
Daniel Schwartz
----------
To whom it may concern,

On behalf of the UW Clean Energy Institute (CEI), it is my pleasure to give my strongest support to this proposal. I am excited that this proposal would provide UW undergraduate and graduate students no-cost access to a state-of-art facility for making pouch cell batteries for studying battery fatigue. Battery fatigue is a major technical problem that affects the clean energy economy at many levels from the operation of electric vehicles to grid-scale electrical storage.

The ability to make state-of-the-art, long-life batteries at the UW having novel materials chemistry will be a major step forward for the research efforts of upper-division undergraduate and graduate students involved in battery research at the UW, and will also support the education and outreach activities of the student Clean Energy Ambassadors program by enabling these UW students to make pouch cells for public demonstrations and activities.

The CEI will provide space and technical support for the pouch cell factory as a component in a new battery preparation and testing facility being organized by Prof. Venkat Subramanian of the department of Chemical Engineering. Prof. Seidler of the Physics department will oversee the initial acquisition and installation of the system, in addition to establishing guidelines for the preparation of x-ray compatible batteries for UW students to use in the CEI-XANES spectrometer.

The system will be professionally maintained and user training will be made available free of charge. Access will be provided to qualified graduate and undergraduate students who are actively involved in battery research or education upon the request of their research supervisor or an advanced course instructor. As per the STF program guidelines, consumables will be supplied for all UW students without charge.

Yours Sincerely,
David S. Ginger, Jr.
Professor and Lawton Distinguished Scholar in Chemistry
Adjunct Professor of Physics (by courtesy)
Associate Director for Education, UW Clean Energy Institute
----------

Installation Timeline

An equipment order will be placed as soon as the funds are allocated. The lead time estimated from the supplier is 12-16 weeks. Once received, we anticipated 1-2 weeks to assemble and install all the components in the designated MolES space.

Resources Provided by Department

While this proposal is officially submitted through the Physics Department, the long-term hosting and support of the requested apparatus will be performed by the UW Clean Energy Institute, see ‘access restrictions’ above for more information. Additional consumables for student use will be purchased by participating research groups or by the CEI. These are not expensive. The CEI will provide the finished experimental space for the BPT-UF, including the space for the pouch-cell factory, and will also provide technical staff support and financial support for the maintenance and user training on that apparatus.

Access Restrictions (if any)

The ‘pouch cell factory’ will become part of the Clean Energy Institute’s (CEI’s) new Battery Preparation and Testing User Facility (BPT-UF), presently under construction in the basement of MolES. While other equipment in the BPT-UF may require user fees, the CEI agrees with the terms of the STF program that students will not be charged for the use of the pouch-cell factory or for the associated, inexpensive consumables. That being said, use of the system will be restricted to UW students who are actively involved in battery research or who are actively enrolled in a course focusing on battery technology where the course instructor has made arrangements with the BPT-UF staff for the exact assignment and responsibilities of the student. All users of the pouch-cell factory and the BPT-UF or CEI-XANES will receive, and must pass, basic safety and operational training.

Student Endorsements

Dear Evaluation Committee,

I am a graduate student in Dr. Cody Schlenker's group, performing research on high energy battery materials. Specifically, we are studying the interfacial and structural processes with which the maximum energy density of a material can be retained over a large number of cycles.

From experience, I can confidently say that results obtained by pouch cell characterization increases the strength of a dataset. By minimizing the number of interfaces with which electrical current must pass through in a pouch cell, particular electrochemical metrics are better resolved than in a coin cell. Additionally, the unique x-ray instrumentation developed at UW for in-situ microscopic characterization of next-generation materials will enable myself and other researchers at UW to utilize this tool for optimizing the performance of such materials.

This 'pouch cell battery factory' would be incredibly important for my graduate work, and has the potential to impact a number of industries, national labs and other universities. As such, I strongly support the proposal to obtain the equipment required for the fabrication and characterization of pouch cells that would become part of the CEI battery prep and testing shared user facility.

Jarred Olson
Department of Chemistry
----------
To whom it may concern

I am a graduate student in Chemical Engineering, doing research on electrical energy storage in the group of Prof. Venkat Subramanian. Specifically, I am studying modeling for All Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries. It would be a useful step forward in my graduate research to be able to easily prepare model-battery cells that can be cycled hundreds of times until failure and the ability use x-ray methods to study the microscopic changes that occur upon charging and discharging my batteries. Hence, I strongly support the proposal to acquire the 'pouch cell battery factory' that would become part of the CEI battery prep and testing shared user facility. This is a big deal for my work, and would continue to be a big deal for other students in my group now and in the future.

Seongbeom Lee
Chemical Engineering
----------
I am a graduate student in the materials science and engineering department operating under the guidance of Professor Guozhong Cao. The research topics I pursue in this position include the development of advanced battery electrodes for renewable energy, with the main focus being Na-ion chemistry (Li-ion is also a secondary interest). To have a facility on campus with the capabilities of producing pouch cells would provide enumerable benefits to our endeavors, especially as we look towards eventual commercialization. Pouch cells would allows us to monitor the changes our electrodes our undergoing during the cycling process by means of X-Ray analysis. It would also allow us to look into the mechanical durability/stability and more easily perform safety tests on the materials we synthesize. Such a center, would also provide a collaborative facility for all battery researchers at the UW across several disciplines (PIs: 5 materials, 1 modeling, 1 tools) to interact and share ideas, something that is currently lacking at UW. Having the capability to make these larger cells would allows us to evaluate novel battery chemistries in a more practical and timely manner. I believe that having these resources are critical towards the continued success that UW plans on having in the renewable energy sector with the emphasis on renewable battery technologies.

Evan Uchaker
Materials Science and Engineering
----------
To whom it may concern,

I fully support the acquisition of a pouch cell production line. The ability to create pouch cells will be a boon to my research specifically, as I am going to be using the CEI-XANES instrument to perform x-ray spectroscopy on batteries to study fatigue. The pouch cell production line would be huge for me specifically because our current method of using coin cells with kapton windows has the problems of quick degradation and atypical internal conditions. Pouch cells rectify both these issues and are commonly used in x-ray spectroscopy applications. The system proposed is easy to use and being able to create my own pouch cells will give me a degree of control I don't currently have.

Alex Ditter
Seidler Group
Physics
----------
I am a graduate student in Molecular Engineering, studying next-generation lithium-ion batteries in the group of Prof. Alex Jen. Specifically, I am working to develop conductive polymer binders to replace traditional additives, which will enable high-capacity silicon-based devices with over an order of magnitude higher capacity than current batteries. The addition of a shared-usage battery fabrication facility would be a tremendous boon for my graduate work, as it would make the construction process both easier and faster, eliminating a major bottleneck in developing publishable results. Additionally, the pouch cell format and availability of X-ray characterization tools would allow me to better study the unique behavior of silicon in this system. Finally, I strongly believe that undergraduate access to a facility like this would help to "de-mystify" the battery fabrication process and get more students excited about battery research, as well as preparing them to do their own work in the field later on. An experience like this would have undoubtedly helped me tremendously going into graduate school. For all of these reasons, I strongly support the proposal to acquire the 'pouch cell battery factory' that would become part of the CEI battery prep and testing shared user facility. Such a facility would help to cement the UW's place as a leader in energy storage research, both immediately and in the future.

Dion Hubble
Ph.D. Student, UW Molecular Engineering
Jen Group
----------
I, Manan Pathak, am a PhD student in the Chemical Engineering department, and I am working with Prof. Venkat Subramanian on research related to Li ion batteries. We are trying to experimentally determine the effects of model-based optimal charging profiles that we have developed. It would be a significant step forward in my graduate research to be able to easily prepare model-battery cells that can be cycled hundreds of times until failure and the ability to use x-ray methods to study the microscopic changes that occur upon charging and discharging the batteries. Hence, I strongly support the proposal to acquire the 'pouch cell battery factory' that would become part of the CEI battery prep and testing shared user facility. This would be important for my work, and would continue to be so for other students in my group currently and in the future.

Thanks and Regards.

Manan Pathak
Chemical Engineering
----------
I support the creation of a pouch cell production line. Having the capability to develop pouch cells would benefit me greatly and allow for an experimental counterpart to support my current theory project on electronic structure.

Ryan Valenza
Physics
----------
I can attest from firsthand experience to the difficulty of performing advanced x-ray spectroscopies on standard coin cell batteries. The thickness of the casing for these coin cells greatly hampers measurements and the typical work-arounds can dramatically alter the battery cycling and chemistry, thus painting an inconsistent picture of true battery operation. After discussing these difficulties to contacts in the battery research team at Argonne National Laboratories, it became clear that the pouch cell design was the way to go. I have since discussed the idea with a number of students and faculty from a wide range of departments and was delighted to find that the ability to make pouch cells would have significant impact on their research as well. For these reasons I initiated this proposal with my fellow graduate student, Alex Ditter. Having a pouch cell production line on campus will be a great benefit to myself and to my fellow students and I offer the project my full support.

Devon Mortensen
X-ray Spectroscopy Lab
Department of Physics
----------
As a graduate student developing advanced battery diagnostics, a battery making facility would not only help me in my research, but also offer a unique opportunity for the undergraduate researchers in our group to gain valuable and practical experience.

Matthew D. Murbach
Graduate Student
Schwartz Research Group
Department of Chemical Engineering
----------
As an undergraduate Chemical Engineering student researching a technology to better analyze batteries, having a battery making facility on campus would be an extremely useful resource towards further understanding battery systems. Going forward, the technology we are developing helps research and development of new battery products and would immensely help initiation of a battery making facility.

Brendan Erickson
----------
I am a undergraduate in the Department of Chemical Engineering. As my senior design project is based on battery diagnostic technology, having a battery making facility available on campus would be an immense help. There have been many times when having access to custom made batteries and battery materials would have aided in my research and given me a better understanding of the physical processes that happen inside of them.

Daniel Gilbert
Undergraduate student
Department of Chemical Engineering
----------
Having a battery making facility on campus would be a great benefit to the undergraduate research I am a part of. It would be a tremendous help in understanding the complexity that battery systems are.

Arianna Whitten
----------

Items

Group Funded Item Unit price Quantity Subtotal
Equipment

Tube Furnance

$4,886.00 1 $4,886.00
Description

1200 C Split Tube Furnace with UL Recognized Components- OTF-1200X-UL-80

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/1200CSplitTubeFurnace-OTF-1200X-UL.aspx)

Justification

This is a necessary component for preparation of active battery materials. The furnace is used specifically for sintering and synthesizing electrode powders.

Ball Mill

$5,886.00 1 $5,886.00
Description

Bench-Top Planetary Ball Mill with 4 Alumina Jars (500ml) & Quick Clamp- MSK-SFM-1

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/Bench-TopPlanetaryAutomaticBallMillswith4AluminaJars-MSK-SFM-1.aspx)

Justification

This is a necessary component for preparation of active battery materials. The ball mill is used to mix and grind the electrode materials into an extremely fine and uniform powder which is necessary for consistent battery performance.

Vacuum Mixer

$21,950.00 1 $21,950.00
Description

2 Liter Tri-Shaft Planetary Vacuum Mixer with Vacuum Pump and PLC Touch Panel Control- MSK-SFM-10M

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/Tri-ShaftPlanetaryVacuumMixerwithObservationWindow-MSK-SFM-10M.aspx)

Justification

This is a necessary component for preparation of active battery materials. The mixer is used to blend the various electrode materials (prepared using the tube furnace and ball mill) with binder to form an "electrode slurry". Vacuum is necessary to ensure a gas-bubble free blending, to prevent contamination, and to prevent reaction of the active materials with air and moisture.

Film Coater

$6,298.00 1 $6,298.00
Description

Compact Tape Casting Film Coater with Dryer, Vacuum Chuck & Adjustable Film Applicator (110 VAC)- MSK-AFA-III

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/CompactTapeCastingFilmCoater-MSK-AFA-III.aspx)

Justification

This is a necessary component for preparing battery electrodes. The coater takes the slurry prepared using the vacuum mixer and "paints" it onto the electrode substrate. The equipment produces smooth, consistent films of variable thicknesses.

Hot Rolling Press

$8,796.00 1 $8,796.00
Description

Precision 4" Hot Rolling Press/Valender up to 125 C, 220 V- MSK-HRP-01

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/4WidthElectricHotRollingPress/Calenderupto130C-EQ-HRP-01.aspx)

Justification

This is a necessary component for preparing battery electrodes. The hot press takes the coated sheets (made using the film coater) and passes them through a pair of heated rollers. The purpose of this procedure is to increase the active material density of the electrode and insure consistent performance.

Pouch Cell Case Machine

$14,950.00 1 $14,950.00
Description

Pouch Cell Case/Cup Forming Machine for Aluminum-Laminated Films- MSK-120

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/PouchCellCase/CupFormingMachine-MSK-120.aspx)

Justification

The machine is used to prepare the casing for the battery cells. The machine allows for adjustable sizing to fit a variety of battery designs.

Die Cutter

$10,495.00 1 $10,495.00
Description

Semi-Automatic Die Cutter for pouch cell electrode sheet- MSK-180

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/SemiAutomaticDieCutterofElectrodes-MSK-180.aspx)

Justification

This is a necessary component for producing pouch cells. It takes the coated electrode sheets (prepared with the film coater and hot rolling press) and punches out specific shapes with current collector tabs. The size of these punched electrodes perfectly matches the casing made using the pouch cell case machine.

Metal Welder

$21,980.00 1 $21,980.00
Description

Desk-Top 800W Ultrasonic Metal Welder with Touch-Screen Digital Controller, 40Khz, 110V- MSK-800W

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/DeskTopUltrasonicMetalWelder-MSK-800.aspx)

Justification

This is a necessary component for battery cell assembly. It is designed both to weld stacked electrode sheets and to weld the electrical leads onto the current collectors. Without a proper weld of the leads, the batteries are prone to malfunction and failure.

Vacuum Oven

$2,398.00 1 $2,398.00
Description

UL/CSA Class 53L 250 C 110V Vacuum Oven with 28 Segments Temperature Controller- EQ-DZF-6050-UL

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/UL/CSAClass53L250C110VVacuumOven16x13x14With28SegmentsTempe.aspx)

Justification

The oven is used for drying and curing the electrode before pouch cell assembly. Again, vacuum is necessary to prevent contamination and reaction of the active material with air and moisture.

Pump for Vacuum Oven

$1,098.00 1 $1,098.00
Description

Double Step Rotary Vane Vacuum Pump (110V), 226L/m, with Exhaust Filter & KF-D25 Inlet- EQ-2TW-4C

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/search.aspx?find=EQ-2TW-4C%2c)

Justification

This vacuum pump is used with the vacuum oven.

Stacking Machine

$3,599.95 1 $3,599.95
Description

Semi-Automatic Stacking Machine for Pouch Cell- MSK-111A

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/SemiAutomaticStackingMachineforPouchCell-MSK-111A.aspx)

Justification

This component is necessary for pouch cell assembly. It is used to stack together multiple layers of positive electrode, negative electrode, and separator to amplify the voltage of the resulting battery. This procedure must be done with extreme care as any misalignment can short out the battery, preventing its operation. This machine takes care of the process in a quick and consistent manner.

Heating Sealer

$4,599.00 1 $4,599.00
Description

Compact Heating Sealer for Sealing laminated Aluminum Case of Pouch Cells- MSK-140

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/search.aspx?find=msk-140%2c)

Justification

The component is necessary for pouch cell assembly. It is used to seal the edges of the pouch cell case in preparation of the injection of electrolyte.

Glove Box

$29,998.00 1 $29,998.00
Description

Large Glove Box with Gas Purification System and Digital Control- EQ-VGB-6-LD

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/GloveBoxwithGasPurificationSystemandDigitalControl-EQ-VGB-6.aspx)

Justification

This is a necessary component for pouch cell assembly. The glove box is a piece of equipment widely used in material science, chemistry, physics, etc. It is used to carefully control and monitor the gas environment of sensitive chemicals. In our application this includes the electrode material and the electrolyte. If done in an open-air environment, the battery chemistry will be irreparably altered.

Electrolyte Dispenser

$495.00 1 $495.00
Description

Bottletop Electrolyte Digital Dispenser with 1000mL Stainless Steel Bottle- BD-10ML-LD

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/BottletopElectrolyteDigitalDispenserwith500mLGlassBottle1-10ml.aspx)

Justification

This is a necessary component for pouch cell assembly. It is used to inject a controlled amount of electrolyte into the battery cell. It is used inside the glove box.

Electrolyte Degassing Chamber

$5,686.00 1 $5,686.00
Description

Electrolyte Diffusion & Degassing Chamber for Professional Li-ion Battery Research- MSK-170

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/VacuumStandingBoxforProfessionalLithiumBatteryResearch-MSK-170.aspx)

Justification

This is a necessary component for pouch cell assembly. It is used to remove gas from the electrolyte (injected into the cell using the Electrolyte Dispenser) and to insure the electrolyte is completely absorbed by the layers.

Vacuum Sealer

$6,985.00 1 $6,985.00
Description

Compact Vacuum Sealer for Preparing Pouch Cell, 110V- MSK-115A

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/CompactVacuumSealerforPreparingPouchCell-MSK-115A.aspx)

Justification

This is a necessary component for pouch cell assembly. It is used to seal the pouch cell case after the injection and degassing of the electrolyte. It is also used to re-seal the pouch in the event that gas needs to be re-released. It is often the case that additional gas with be liberated from the electrolyte after battery cycling. Build up of gas inside case will cause the cell to fail.

Battery Analyzer

$4,098.00 1 $4,098.00
Description

8 Channel Battery Analyzer with Laptop & Software for Research- BST8-MA

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/8ChannelsBatteryAnalyzer-BST8-MA.aspx)

Justification

This equipment is used both to cycle and monitor the prepared battery pouch cells. It is an extremely useful part of the analysis. The battery analyzer allows for 8 samples to simultaneously and independently be cycled.

We acknowledge that this item contains a laptop, which the STF normally requires to be purchased through CDW-G. However, our vendor for the battery analyzer and software does not generally sell these items without the included laptop. I have spoken to a sales representative and was told that ordering just the analyzer and software would require a custom order that would end up costing roughly the same amount in the end (only without the laptop). Furthermore, purchasing the laptop through MTI will insure that it will integrate smoothly with the battery analyzer hardware and software.

Shipping

MTI Equipment Shipping & Handling Fees

$3,433.00 1 $3,433.00
Description

These are the shipping fees as quoted by MTI Corp.

Justification

Shipping and handling fees for the items listed in the equipment category.

MTI Supplies Shipping & Handling Fees

$255.00 1 $255.00
Description

These are the shipping fees as quoted by MTI Corp.

Justification

Shipping and handling fees for the items listed in the supplies category from MTI.

Soulbrain Shipping

$40.00 1 $40.00
Description

These are the shipping & handling fees as quoted by Soulbrain.

Justification

Shipping and handling fees for the electrolyte listed in the supplies category.

Supplies

Laminated Aluminum Film

$281.20 8 $2,249.60
Description

Aluminum Laminated Film for Pouch Cell Case- EQ-alf-400-7.5M

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/AluminumLaminatedFilm400mmWx7.5mL-EQ-alf-400-7.5M.aspx)

Justification

In addition to the equipment listed above, we are requesting an initial stock of consumables needed to produce working batteries. This will insure that the pouch cell production line will be entirely cost-free to students. As explained in the proposal, additional consumables required for student use would be purchased either by the participating research group or by the CEI. Students will never be charged for either equipment use or consumables.

The laminated aluminum film is the raw material used to form the holding case for the battery cell. It is coated with a special heat-sealing material that allows for a safe and consistent seal of the created battery. This material is used in conjunction with the equipment listed above.

Copper Foil

$375.25 3 $1,125.75
Description

Copper Foil for Battery Anode Substrate- EQ-bccf-9u

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/CopperFoilforBatteryAnodeSubstrate190mlengthx298mmwidthx9umt.aspx)

Justification

Copper foil acts as a substrate onto which the battery anode material is deposit. A metallic foil of some kind (copper being the most common) is required to collect the current generated by the battery cell.

Aluminum Foil

$232.75 3 $698.25
Description

Aluminum Foil for Battery Cathode Substrate- EQ-bcaf-15u-280

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/AluminumFoilforBatteryCathodeSubstrate-EQ-bcaf-15u-280.aspx)

Justification

Aluminum foil acts as a substrate onto which the battery cathode material is deposit. A metallic foil of some kind (aluminum being the most common for cathodes) is required to collect the current generated by the battery cell.

Lithium Foil

$664.95 2 $1,329.90
Description

Lithium (Li) Foil- Lib-LiF-35M

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/LithiumLiFoil35000mmLengthx76.5mmWidthx0.06mmThick.aspx)

Justification

Lithium (Li) foil is used in a "half-cell" Li-ion batteries in place of one of the electrodes. These half-cells allow for independent testing of a single electrode material, which is the first step in evaluating any novel battery chemistry.

Separator Film

$471.20 2 $942.40
Description

Li-ion Battery Separator Film- EQ-bsf-0025-400C

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/separatorfilm-EQ-bsf-0025-400C.aspx)

Justification

Separator film is used both to safely store the battery electrolyte in a working cell and to electronically isolate each battery electrode. If the electrodes come into contact it creates an electrical short which prevents the battery from operating. Separator film of this kind is a stand component in any Li-ion battery.

Aluminum Tabs

$28.76 10 $287.60
Description

4 mm width Aluminum Tab as Positive Terminal for Pouch Cell, 50pcs/Box- EQ-PLiB-ATC4

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/4mmwidthAluminumTabasPositiveTerminalforPolymerLi-ionBattery50pc.aspx)

Justification

The aluminum tab is welded onto the battery using the Metal Welder listed in the equipment section above. It acts as the positive electrical lead which is required to draw power from the pouch cell.

Nickel Tabs

$31.10 10 $311.00
Description

4mm Width Nickel Tab as Negative Terminal for Pouch Cell, 50pcs/Box- EQ-PLiB-NTA4

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/4mmWidthNickelTabasNegativeTerminalforPolymerLi-ionBattery50pcs.aspx)

Justification

The nickel tab is welded onto the battery using the Metal Welder listed in the equipment section above. It acts as the negative electrical lead which is required to draw power from the pouch cell.

Hot Melt Tape

$189.95 2 $379.90
Description

Hot Melt Adhesive (Polymer Tape) for Heat Sealing Pouch Cell Tabs- EQ-PLiB-HMA4

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/HotMeltAdhesivePolymerTapeforHeatSealingPouchCellTabs100mL.aspx)

Justification

The hot melt tape is a special polymer which creates an air-tight seal when heated. It is used in conjunction with the aluminum and nickel tabs listed above. Without a proper seal, the battery will be exposed to atmosphere which can lead to leakage of electrolyte and catastrophic battery failure.

Strapping Tape

$29.95 2 $59.90
Description

Strapping Tape for Pouch/Cylinder Cell- EQ-LiB-ST

Quote from: MTI Corp. (http://www.mtixtl.com/Li-ionBatteryStrappingTape200mLx10mmWx0.03mmThicknessforPouc.aspx)

Justification

Strapping tape is used to hold together the battery core. This tape is electrically insulating and has a strong resistance to commonly used battery electrolytes, making it ideal for use in pouch cell batteries.

Electrolyte

$800.00 1 $800.00
Description

2 kg of LiPF6 electrolyte (called Selectilyte LP 40 by manufacturer)- 50285918

Quote from: Soulbrain (http://soulbrainmi.com/)

Justification

This is a standard electrolyte that can be used in a wide variety of Li-ion batteries. The electrolyte shuttles charged ions between the two battery electrodes which is required for the chemical reactions that result in current. It is a major component of all batteries.

Tax

Sales Tax

$15,780.48 1 $15,780.48
Description

Sales tax based on the King County rate of 9.5%.

Justification

This is the sales tax calculated used the rate of 9.5% required from King County. We note that the machinery listed in the equipment section should likely fall under the University's Machinery and Equipment (M&E) Sales Tax Exemption. In this case the listed sales tax would be reduced accordingly. The items listed in supplies are consumables and therefore would not qualify for the exemption.

Total requested: $181,890.73

Total funded: $0.00

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