Proposal

No annual report

Introduction

Proposal ID 2015-020
Submitted January 15, 2015
Owner geoffkorf
Department Drama, School of
Category Frontier Technology
Funding Status Fully Funded
Metric Score 4.21

Contacts

Primary
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Geoff Korf
  • Professor
  • gkorf@uw.edu
  • (323) 353-1709
  • 353950
Budget
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Kathy Burch
  • Administrator
  • kburch@uw.edu
  • (206) 543-1746
  • 353950
Dean
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Elizabeth Cooper
  • Divisional Dean of Arts (A & S)
  • bcoop@uw.edu
  • (206) 616-4744
  • 353765

Descriptions

Abstract

This frontier proposal is to purchase sixty Source Four Series 2 Lustr LED ellipsoidal fixtures to be used on the Seattle Campus by any student for any live performance.

Category Justification

In 1992, Electronic Theatre Controls (ETC) released the conventional (incandescent) Source Four Ellipsoidal. At the time, it was approximately 3 times more expensive that the standard ERS units being used in theatres. It used only about 60% of the wattage but delivered comparable brightness and superior optics. In just a few years, the Source Four propelled ETC from ‘start up’ status to the undisputed industry standard. By 2004 (or so,) it had completely replaced the inventories in both big and small professional theatres across the country. The Source Four LED series 2 Lustr ERS is very likely to cause a similar revolution in live performance. The first series was introduced in 2012, and series two was released in late 2013/early 2014. The series two (with EDLT lenses) is comparable in brightness to the conventional Source Four. It uses about 25% of the wattage, however, and it can change its color remotely by additive color mixing of seven different LED colors built into the fixture. Conventional Source Fours require a consumable color ‘gel’ to alter the color, and that cannot be changed remotely. While color-changing accessories do exist for the remote manipulation of color for a conventional fixture, those color changers also require a cooling fan to preserve the color media. The noise caused by those fans can often create a real distraction for the audience in a performance. One of the big benefits of the LED color changing is that it does so silently.

The lamp of a conventional fixture has a life of approximately 2000 hours, but is easily shortened by the jostling of the fixture as it gets hung, and re-hung for different shows. The LED lamps are rated to last 50,000 hours and they are not affected by jostling. The LED fixtures will reduce ongoing costs in energy consumption, lamp replacement, labor costs associated with lamp replacement and hanging multiple fixtures for different colors, and HVAC costs, which are huge in performance venues. Every indication is that in the next 10 to 20 years, the LED ERS will, like it’s conventional predecessor, replace the entire ERS inventory of professional theatres around the globe. The fixture is so versatile and efficient that it seems inevitable. By the time a current lighting student hits the peak of his or her career in the performing arts, the LED fixture is likely to be the standard instrument in use in most theatres. While it’s also likely that there will be a series 4 or 5 fixture by that time, the basic principles of working with the additive color mixing and other unique properties of the LED fixture should still be applicable to future developments in the field. Cost, brightness and efficacy are the most likely areas to be improved in future development of the fixture. Currently the Lustr2 costs about 7 times more than a conventional Source Four, but it has already dropped about 20 percent in price since it’s release two years ago.

I had the opportunity to work with a small inventory of these fixtures this summer on a professional production, and while I was originally skeptical about the feasibility of a color-changing LED ERS fixture, I was completely convinced of the fixture’s value and future dominance after working with it. Seattle Repertory just purchased a few dozen in the last month, and the Oregon Shakespeare Festival purchased a number of comparable fixtures (from a different manufacturer) last season. This past spring, we were fortunate to have 8 demo Source Four LED fixtures on campus for 3 weeks for a student dance concert. The students working with them viewed them very favorably. These fixtures have been tested and are just starting to be used in the professional environment and have a very high likelihood of successful and extended use for our students.

While various kinds of LED stage fixtures have been around for many years, the ERS LED is a much more recent development in the field. There are other theatre programs with LED fixtures, but I have not yet heard of the ERS LED being adopted into the inventories of comparable training programs to UW. There is little doubt that having this brand new technology available to our students will put them a notch ahead of students at other universities. While these fixtures are brand new now, they will undoubtedly begin to show up in other training programs in the coming years. The opportunity to provide this as a ‘novel’ asset at UW is likely to diminish over the next few years.

The only other fixture that we have on the Seattle campus that uses similar technology are the Selador fixtures that were purchased through STF two years ago. (2012-112-1) Those fixtures are shared by Dance and Drama and are designed primarily to light a flat backdrop or to be used as footlights. In those specific applications the Selador fixture is exceptional and we have been very happy with them. We also used them in the Meany Studio recently for a system of backlights in the autumn production of Sweet Charity. Backlighting is an application that is typically better suited to an ERS unit because of its controllable beam and while the Selador’s color versatility was a great asset, they did have their shortcomings in terms of controlling focus. We feel that this experience points strongly to the value of having an inventory of LED ERS fixtures on campus. The Seladors share a similar color mixing system with the Lustr fixtures, but they do not share the controllable beam that only an ERS can provide. Besides the twenty Selador fixtures, there are no other LED fixtures currently available to UW students.

Background

LED Lighting has been developing especially rapidly over the last seven years. There have been many LED stage or concert fixtures debuted during this time, but until recently, there has not been a reliable and viable multi color LED Ellipsoidal Reflector Spotlight (ERS.) The ERS is the main staple in modern theatrical lighting, but the first LED version of an ERS was not released until 2010 by Robert Juliat. Because of the design of the reflector, an ERS has the most controllable beam of any type of fixture. It allows a designer to mold the beam to any shape, and it also allows for the use of ‘gobos’ to project patterns within the beam of the light. The ERS makes up the majority of lighting inventory in the American professional theatre. It is the ‘bread and butter’ of lighting for the performing arts. Among ERS fixtures, the Electronic Theatre Controls (ETC) ‘Source Four’ is overwhelmingly the most popular in the U.S.. In the past year, ETC released their second iteration of the Source Four LED ERS, named the ‘Lustr’. The new fixture is the Series 2 Lustr. Last year, because of our connections with ETC and Barbizon lighting, we were able to demo 8 of the Lustr+ fixtures (first series) for a Dance concert at UW. I also recently was responsible for the purchase of 15 Lustr2 fixtures for a professional theatre in Los Angeles. The Lustr2’s are a significant improvement over their predecessors and rival the intensity of conventional (incandescent) Source Four ERS fixtures. Besides lowering the price point, the majority of research and development in LED fixtures in past few years has been about increasing the brightness, and stabilizing color variances. The Lustr2 has made significant steps in both of these arenas, and ranges about 10% brighter to 20% dimmer than it’s conventional counterpart, (depending on the color of the light.)

The UW School of Drama has consistently been ranked as one of the top ten theatre training programs in the country. The school serves approximately 175 majors, 40 graduate students, and hundreds of general education students. In our region, both the Drama and Dance programs at UW are unique in their excellence of training in the performing arts. In many cases, these two programs offer UW students their first encounter with a performing arts experience and often their first opportunity for a direct means of creative expression and collaborative aesthetic development. [While this proposal comes from the School of Drama, it was made with the consultation of the Dance program, and would directly benefit students in both programs.] Between Drama and Dance there are twelve unique productions with more than 50 public performances each year. Programming each season includes the creation of new works, classical work, and multi-disciplinary artistic collaborations. Approximately 14,000 members of the Seattle campus and the extended community attend our productions each season.

The acquisition of these cutting edge fixtures on the Seattle campus would serve student designers, choreographers, directors, performers and audience members by dramatically expanding the range of artistic choices in on-campus productions, concerts, and other live events. In many cases UW arts students are creating and performing work at the forefront of their disciplines. Their visionary work in the performing arts is inherently collaborative and interdisciplinary. There are many venues for the performing arts at UW, including the Jones Playhouse, the Penthouse Theatre, Meany Hall for the Performing Arts, and many smaller ‘studio’ spaces. These venues support the development and presentation of student creative research; they serve as our laboratories and are in constant demand. They require new technology and equipment in the same manner as our more traditional student computer labs on campus. The funding of this proposal would give students access to extraordinary, cutting-edge lighting technology in these lab spaces.

Benefits to Students and the University

Benefits to students can be thought of as a series of four concentric circles. At the center is a small group so students who are pursuing the study of lighting design. There are between six and ten of these students any given year and they would be designing how the fixtures would be utilized in our productions. This small group of dedicated students would gain immense technical and conceptual understanding of how to utilize these unique lights. The Series 2 fixtures are maximized for high-brightness in both deep and ‘soft-tint’ colors. They work beautifully alongside existing tungsten fixtures so our lighting students will be able to supplement our larger conventional inventories with the LEDs. In addition because the response time of an LED lamp is so much faster than an incandescent lamp, the Lustr2s can be programmed to function like strobe lights. (Color-changing strobe lights!) As mentioned above, we believe the LED ERS will eventually become a standard in the professional theatre, so becoming proficient in the use of these fixtures will be critical for these lighting design students.

The second circle in the concentric ring analogy is slightly larger and it consists of the students involved in the original conception and creation of the performance. These are the directors, choreographers, composers, and other designers. This circle comprises forty to fifty students from Dance and Drama. This team of people (usually five or six per production,) are the conceptual leaders of a production, and the versatility that the Lustr2 fixtures bring to the table will allow this group of conceivers to stretch their imaginations wider and will offer them solutions to creative challenges that would not otherwise be available.

The third circle of students consists of students who are involved in performing in or working on the performances. This includes actors, crewmembers, stage managers, and other people contributing to the collaborative artistic expression that is live performance. In Drama and Dance, this group would include about 200 students. The more effective each element is in a performance the more effective the total event becomes. Most performing artists agree that there is a holistic effect involved where the total performance can exceed the individual contribution of each element. More effective, dynamic lighting benefits all of the contributors of the performance.

Finally the largest circle consists of the students who attend the productions that will utilize the fixtures. This group includes anywhere from 2,000 to 7,000 students per year. Because we are proposing to make the fixtures available to any student for any live performance on the Seattle campus, the potential audience here would include not just students seeing the Drama or Dance productions but could include students attending ASUW concerts, events, or other live performances. UTS alone, (an ASUW organization focused on theatre,) performs to thousands of students each year. Because the fixtures are being used to enrich the artistic experience of these live performances, they have an artistic value to every student in the audience.

Because the Lustr2 uses only 171 watts (as opposed to 575 watts of a conventional fixture,) and plugs into a standard wall outlet, it is much more portable and viable to use in smaller and non-conventional venues across campus. Any student that can access a standard DMX lighting controller could easily use them anywhere on campus. Unlike conventional lights, the Lustr2s do not require dimmers.

Departmental Endorsements

The way we light our world has been changing rapidly in the past decade. We now mostly use compact fluorescent lights in our homes, and there is a push to change those to more power-efficient LED sources. This same idea has been shaping the future of how we use light in theatrical productions. Our world is moving towards this technology, and we should position our students to be at the head of this movement.
LED technology has taken huge leaps in the past few years, and as a professional lighting designer I use versions of LED resources in more and more shows on which I work. Most of this usage has been in robustly colorful applications, like the Selador Striplights used to change color of backdrops. We have relied mostly on incandescent sources to light actors onstage as they provide a natural quality of illumination that we associate with our world. The LED technology had not previously been adequate to provide that color quality, nor the intensity of those incandescent lighting instruments. This is no longer the case, as this technology has rapidly evolved to a point that LED lighting fixtures represent the pathway into the future of lighting design. The Source Four Lustrs are at the forefront of this evolution, as they now have the natural quality and color of the high-powered incandescent lights that have been the workhorse of our lighting inventory.
As both an alumnus and lecturer for the UW School of Drama, and I can attest to how valuable the LED Proposal would be to our students in the School of Drama, and across the campus as a whole. As a graduate student, I immediately benefited from the Moving Light Funds in my thesis project of Tartuffe with the School of Music in 2005. I believe we are all aware that when our undergrads and grad students get their hands on new technology, they adapt to it quickly and push that equipment into areas that we had not imagined. This equipment has that potential for our students and for the future of theatrical design.
Andrew D. Smith
Lecturer, School of Drama

I strongly the endorse this proposal. This equipment is critical for both actors and directors. For actors because of their relative quiet, which makes for less stress vocally. While volume and projection are a vital part of our actor training, recent less quiet shifts in lighting technology have necessitated more and more use of microphones. We would love to have audiences get their stories on the unmediated voices of the actors. For directors, this speed with which color changes are possible on the same instrument means more choices for the director and the designer. In addition, that changes can be executed in the tech process without having to take time out to switch gels or to orchestrate shifts on noisy color scrollers is a great benefit.
Valerie Curtis-Newton, Professor of Acting and Directing
Head of Performance
Donald E. Petersen Endowed Professor
University of Washington School Of Drama

I fully support The Drama Department proposal to purchase ETC Source Four Series 2 Lustr LED light fixtures.
The ETC Luster is the way we are moving forward in the theatrical profession. Our students need to know how this new fixture works on the stage before they get out into the professional world.
The Dance Department would use these fixtures in Meany Studio Theatre, Meany Theatre, Penthouse theatre, Jones Playhouse theater, dance studio’s where we do shows, and Henry Art museum as well. They are easy to set up and run with very little power required. This is the future, LED is where lighting is going and we need to stay with it. Please fund this fully.
Peter Bracilano
Production Manager
School of Dance & School of Music
University of Washington

Installation Timeline

The equipment can be ordered immediately at the beginning of the funding period. It would typically ship within a few weeks, and would easily be available to students at the beginning of the autumn quarter of 2015.

Resources Provided by Department

The School of Drama has two faculty members and one full time staff position dedicated to teaching lighting. We maintain a nationally recognized professional training program in design and a design track in our BA program. The full-time Master Electrician (M.E.) oversees two student employees (ASEs) each quarter. The M.E. and the ASEs maintain the lighting inventory each year. The M.E. is a professional trained in the repair, maintenance and use of theatrical lighting equipment and is well versed in passing on this knowledge to students. He is available weekdays by phone and e-mail and we have a solid track record of checking out equipment to students on the Seattle campus. The school also intends to update our website to make it easier for students to find information about the STF equipment and to reserve it. The fixtures can be securely stored in the Playhouse Theatre and in the Electrics office of the Drama Scene shop. The school is prepared to build additional lighting racks to accommodate them.

The School of Drama already owns approximately 200 conventional Source Fours with conventional lenses. Because the lenses of the conventional fixtures are interchangeable with the LED fixtures, this provides the ability to change the beam spread for the new fixtures. (There is a decrease in output when using standard lenses instead of the EDLT lenses in this proposal, but it does provide additional flexibility for the use of the new fixtures.) In addition many of the school’s accessories for conventional Source Fours will work with the LED Source Fours, (e.g. gobos, effects machines, gobo rotators, top hats, etc.) The Dance program and Meany hall also maintain significant inventories of conventional fixtures, consoles, and accessories that will work in tandem with the new fixtures.

The School of Drama purchased a new ETC GIO lighting console this year. In addition we have an ETC Ion console that was upgraded two years ago. Both of these consoles are ideal for controlling the LED fixtures. They have color profiles and a color picker that makes the manipulation of the color-changing feature of the Lustr2 seamless and intuitive.

In addition, the School of Drama produces six mainstage, and three or four laboratory, productions each year. This resource of having a supported production with scenery, props, costumes, sound, actors, etc is very valuable for the practice of lighting.

Access Restrictions (if any)

We want students to be exposed to these fixtures and would make them available to any UW student for use on the Seattle Campus. The Lustr2 fixture is actually much more rugged than either the Selador fixture or conventional fixtures, so it is safer to move from venue to venue across campus. The fixtures are relatively simple to use and the important safety considerations could be easily conveyed when ‘checking out’ the fixtures.

This proposal is grouped into two groups so that the committee has the option of funding a larger or a smaller award of fixtures. One of the benefits of the larger package would that multiple students could use multiple fixtures in different venues at the same time. We anticipate that these fixtures would be in high demand by students involved in the ‘mainstage’ Drama and Dance productions. The smaller inventory was conceived to provide just enough fixtures for such productions. The larger award would greatly improve the ability to provide fixtures for ‘incidental’ or ‘less-planned’ use and for simultaneous productions in multiple venues.

Another significant benefit of getting sixty of these lights is to create the unique opportunity for a creative team to use them for a production without needing to supplement them with conventional fixtures. In all of the above examples of professional theatres beginning to purchase LED fixtures, they are buying a limited number to supplement a conventional inventory. In a professional lighting plot there might be 200 to 300 total lighting fixtures of which 20 or 30 are LED fixtures. In a few of our smaller venues at UW such as the Penthouse Theatre, or the Cabaret where UTS performs, or the ‘260’ dance studios on the fourth floor of Meany, it would be possible to create a lighting plot with 100% Lustr2 fixtures. To design a whole plot with only these fixtures would be an absolutely novel experience for our students: one that would not currently happen in even the most sophisticated of professional environments.

As with past SFT equipment, students would be able to find out about the equipment either from word of mouth, or from the proposal on the STF website. We plan to add a new webpage to the School’s site listing the STF equipment we maintain along with a reservation form. In addition, the School of Drama will credit STF in the show program for any production that uses the new equipment. This credit would also include the web address of our STF page so that any student who sees a Drama production will be aware that the equipment is available.

Student Endorsements

I am a directing student, and the sheer potential that these lights provide for more ‘magic making’ is immense. The way these lights allows for a lighting designer to create more nuanced story through light with greater flexibility and ease can not be understated. The rapid pursuit of a new idea is possible due to the versatility of the instrument themselves. It is not only a gift, but I believe, a crucial element of UW’s success that we in the School of Drama get to work with incredible instruments that challenge us and create opportunities to fulfill one’s potential before entering the workforce. To be working on the front line of innovation and artistry is exactly where we should be and the addition of these lights to the School of Drama’s arsenal will only serve our work and greater community.
Leah Adcock-Starr
MFA Directing Candidate, University of Washington

These instruments are very versatile and allow a designer an unprecedented amount of freedom in artistic expression. As a designer (especially an undergraduate designer) these are freedoms that I do not often get. I do a lot of design with the Undergraduate Theater Society, and I constantly struggle with the limitations in the space that we use (from lack of instrumentation, only low-voltage power, and non-existent budget). Access to instruments of these type truly addresses all three of these issues, and benefits the entire undergraduate drama program (actors, directors, and designers are able to practice the craft at a more professional and real-world applicable level as we are able to scale up our productions). In addition, our performances will be (even more) a source of pride, and audience members will benefit from attending more successful shows.
Beyond that, this cutting edge technology gives the University and its students an edge on a very technology and knowledge dependent industry. The primary aspect that sets this STF proposal apart from (my knowledge of) past School of Drama STF proposals is the scale. The shear number of instruments outlined will ensure that there are enough for all students studying lighting design to both have adequate access to and meaningful interaction with these instruments. This is an opportunity that I truly yearn for, not just for the impact on myself but also the impact on my peers, the university, and the environment (as these instruments use significantly less power than a conventional instrument).
Please note that while I am an Environmental Science and Resource Management major, I am actively involved in the Drama department, taking all upper level lighting design classes, and interested in pursuing lighting design as a career.
Bryce Bartl-Geller, Class of 2017, Environmental Science and Resource Management

My name is Storme Sundberg and I am a second year graduate student in Dance. I am writing to endorse the frontier proposal for LED ERS Lighting. This upgrade will benefit performing arts at UW and further the university's commitment to quality and excellence. Theater technology supports highly professional productions and prepare students for futures in the field. This proposal is an important step for upholding aesthetic standards and maintaining standards for technology integration.
Storme Sundberg
Teaching Assistant/M.F.A. Candidate
University of Washington Dance

As a theater director I have worked in many capacities in Seattle and the Pacific Northwest staging and producing performances in multiple professional venues. Some of those experiences have been hanging and designing lights or working with a lighting designer to help build a strong cohesive design with a plethora of lighting instruments that range from 1990 - 2010. This method of using multiple conventional lights is effective, though, it is not ideal for creating and showcasing professional well-crafted designs in producing and presenting performance venues. Now, as a first year MFA Theater Directing Graduate candidate, I am excited that fellow students and I would have the opportunity to use these Lustr2 fixtures to experiment and learn to create competitive, competent and imaginative design plots that place us on the same stage professionally with designers and directors currently working at the Seattle Repertory Theater and Oregon Shakespeare Festival, among other LORT and presenting theaters across America. By approving this proposal, the University of Washington's School of Drama will continue to be recognized as a leader in training the next best theater professionals in America.
Sean Ryan
Professional Directing Training Program - MFA
UW School of Drama

In the proposal form there was talk of four concentric circles and I am one of the handful that exists within the smallest of circles. As a practicing lighting designer and first year graduate student of University of Washington the potential of such an inventory of ETC Lustr2 fixtures is incredibly appealing. Not only would this increase my exposure to the style of fixture, effectively broadening my scope of knowledge and abilities, they would also offer an incredible learning tool for my craft. In lighting design one area that is often difficult to teach or truly understand without experience and is constantly expanding is color and its mixing. With an LED fixture such as the Lustr2 the sheer amount of exploration into color is opened up to a grand degree without the additional cost of all the gel we traditionally use to color our lighting. Adding these fixtures to the UW inventory will increase the level of performances held on campus, offer more flexibility in the design work of the students creating shows and will be a unmatched learning tool for the skill of lighting design.
Kenrick Fischer

This endorsement comes with great excitement at the possibilities that would become available to the students and projects conducted here at the school of drama as well as the university in general. I have had the opportunity to utilize our current Selador LED fixtures in a lot for the shows I have designed here. The versatility and artistic freedom has been tremendous in creating great vibrant stage looks as well as subtle uses to add accents to backdrops. The one thing that has been a struggle is controlling them for specific focus. Gaining a set of LED Source Four’s would be able to solve that problem and become that much more versatile as a creative tool set.
Furthermore, the lower power consumption of these fixtures opens up a greater versatility to use these lights in site specific projects and non-traditional spaces on campus. It is exciting to think about having a tool as these to that could enhance creative endeavors like this.
John Bernard
3rd year MFA candidate in lighting design

I think it is important for an institution to train their students in modern technology. It is especially important for directors and lighting designers to stay on the forefront of that technology as a way to stay open to all creative possibilities. As a director who has had a serious moment in a play altered by the noise the color changers made, I greatly appreciate that these are part of the instrument and silent. They will help us stay within limitations of the theater space and still be able to create the moments that we envision.
Tina Polzin
MFA Directing Candidate, University of Washington

I am an undergraduate in the dance program, and I support the addition of Lustr2 LED equipment. Students training for careers in theatre, or artists like myself, who plan to support themselves and their art with careers in theatre production, should be able to gain experience with technology that is being used professionally in the industry. If these fixtures become a standard, students applying for jobs will be expected to be fluent in their operation. Most students are paying good money for their tuition, and wish to leave the university with not only a degree and a good liberal arts education, but also skills that will be as marketable as they can possibly be in their field.
Caitlin Ross

With their ability to color mix, these lights force us to think more critically about how they fit into our design concepts and push us to find how we will get the most out of them in service of the show. They also free up dimmers so that we can add more lights to our designs, allowing our choices to be that much more specific to the production. Lighting is shifting towards brighter and more efficient fixtures and having these will give us exposure to the new technologies we will encounter on a daily bases in professional venues. Adding these units to our inventory would be an incredible investment in the future of the lighting program here at the University of Washington.
- Kyle Soble

Items

Group Funded Item Unit price Quantity Subtotal
Primary

Source Four LED ERS Lustr2 Body

$1,724.40 36 $62,078.40
Description

The body or 'Light Engine' that houses the LED lamps and the circuitry for operating them. Includes mounting clamp (C-clamp,) PowerCon cable with Edison connector, Pattern Holder and Internal Soft Focus Diffuser. Does not include Lens.

[Quote provided by Barbizon Light of the Rockies in Denver, CO. Barbizon has been the most competitive bidder in our lighting equipment purchases over the last ten years.]

Justification

This is the central component of the proposal.

ETC EDLT Lens 6.25"

$193.20 36 $6,955.20
Description

Each 6.25" lens could have either a 19, 26, 36, or 50 degree beam. We would like to make the final determination of those beams once we know what the final award is.

[Quote provided by Barbizon Light of the Rockies in Denver, CO. Barbizon has been the most competitive bidder in our lighting equipment purchases over the last ten years.]

Justification

The bodies do not include lenses and specific lenses need to be purchased separately. The EDLT lens is an enhanced definition lens that provides approximately 10% more output than conventional lenses. They are especially well suited to the LED fixtures because they help compensate for the LED's dimmer output (in most colors,) compared to conventional fixtures.

We are proposing a few more lenses than bodies in the primary group to allow some flexibility in the use of the fixtures from venue to venue. In general, larger venues require narrower beams than smaller venues.

ETC EDLT Lens 7.5"

$227.70 4 $910.80
Description

Each 7.5" lens could have either a 14 or 70 degree beam. We would like to make the final determination of those beams once we know what the final award is.

[Quote provided by Barbizon Light of the Rockies in Denver, CO. Barbizon has been the most competitive bidder in our lighting equipment purchases over the last ten years.]

Justification

The bodies do not include lenses and specific lenses need to be purchased separately. The EDLT lens is an enhanced definition lens that provides approximately 10% more output than conventional lenses. They are especially well suited to the LED fixtures because they help compensate for the LED's dimmer output (in most colors,) compared to conventional fixtures.

We are proposing a few more lenses than bodies in the primary group to allow some flexibility in the use of the fixtures from venue to venue. In general, larger venues require narrower beams than smaller venues.

Neither Drama or Dance own any 70 degree lenses, which are particularly useful for short throw situations. If these lights get used in non-traditional or very small spaces, the 70 degree lenses would be a big asset.

ETC EDLT Cyc Lens

$316.00 10 $3,160.00
Description

The Cyc lens is a unique lens that only works on the LED ERS fixture. It give the fixture added versatility by reshaping the beam to be very wide and flat.

[Quote provided by Barbizon Light of the Rockies in Denver, CO. Barbizon has been the most competitive bidder in our lighting equipment purchases over the last ten years.]

Justification

The cyc lens has a unique beam re-shaping property that converts the normally circular beam into a wide rectangle or trapezoidal shape. It can be used for lighting walls, cycloramas and other surfaces and adds a valuable level of flexibility to the Lustr2. 10 such lenses would be required to light the full back wall of the Meany Studio Theatre or the Jones Playhouse.

5-pin DMX Cable (Proplex XLR)-50'

$87.80 2 $175.60
Description

A cable required to remotely control the fixture via a DMX Controller.

Justification

Each Lustr2 needs one power cable (a 'PowerCon' cable,) and control cable (a DMX cable,) in order to operate.

5-pin DMX Cable (Proplex XLR)-25'

$60.50 12 $726.00
Description

A cable required to remotely control the fixture via a DMX Controller.

Justification

Each Lustr2 needs one power cable (a 'PowerCon' cable,) and control cable (a DMX cable,) in order to operate.

5-pin DMX Cable (Proplex XLR)-10'

$44.30 10 $443.00
Description

A cable required to remotely control the fixture via a DMX Controller.

Justification

Each Lustr2 needs one power cable (a 'PowerCon' cable,) and control cable (a DMX cable,) in order to operate.

Hybrid PowerCon/DMX Cable 25'

$129.40 6 $776.40
Description

A dual cable with both DMX and a PowerCon connectors that allows fixtures to be hung more than five feet away from a power feed and/or allows for multiple fixtures to be ‘daisy-chained’ in their installation. [This is not a standard type of extension cord.]

Justification

The Hybrid cable simplifies the connection of multiple Lustr2 units and saves time in set up compared to separate PowerCon jumpers and DMX cables. It is a more 'foolproof' way to insure correct set up of the fixtures by students who may not have any prior experience with them.

Hybrid PowerCon/DMX Cable 10'

$89.60 9 $806.40
Description

A dual cable with both DMX and a PowerCon connector that allows fixtures to be hung more than five feet away from a power feed and/or allows for multiple fixtures to be ‘daisy-chained’ in their installation.

Justification

The Hybrid cable simplifies the connection of multiple Lustr2 units and saves time in set up compared to separate PowerCon jumpers and DMX cables. It is a more 'foolproof' way to insure correct set up of the fixtures by students who may not have any prior experience with them.

Hybrid PowerCon/DMX Cable 5'

$76.70 6 $460.20
Description

A dual cable with both DMX and a PowerCon connector that allows for multiple fixtures to be ‘daisy-chained’ in their installation. [This is not a standard type of extension cord.]

Justification

The Hybrid cable simplifies the connection of multiple Lustr2 units and saves time in set up compared to separate PowerCon jumpers and DMX cables. It is a more 'foolproof' way to insure correct set up of the fixtures by students who may not have any prior experience with them.

Smooth Wash Diffuser 7.5"

$22.40 2 $44.80
Description

A diffuser that goes into the color accessory slot of the light.

Justification

Because the beam of the Lustr2 has such a flat field, a diffuser is sometimes required with two lights overlap to mitigate a ‘bright spot’ where the beams overlap. This accessory is only useful in some circumstances, and we don’t feel we need one for every light purchased.

Smooth Wash Diffuser 6.25"

$21.20 18 $381.60
Description

A diffuser that goes into the color accessory slot of the light.

Justification

Because the beam of the Lustr2 has such a flat field, a diffuser is sometimes required with two lights overlap to mitigate a ‘bright spot’ where the beams overlap. This accessory is only useful in some circumstances, and we don’t feel we need one for every light purchased.

Freight

$500.00 1 $500.00
Description

Estimated freight cost if from Barbizon

Justification

Tax

$7,345.25 1 $7,345.25
Description

Sales tax

Justification

Secondary

Source Four LED ERS Lustr2 Body

$1,724.40 24 $41,385.60
Description

The body or 'Light Engine' that houses the LED lamps and the circuitry for operating them. Includes mounting clamp (C-clamp,) PowerCon cable with Edison connector, Pattern Holder and Internal Soft Focus Diffuser. Does not include Lens.

[Quote provided by Barbizon Light of the Rockies in Denver, CO. Barbizon has been the most competitive bidder in our lighting equipment purchases over the last ten years.]

Justification

The additional 24 bodies would make it possible for full LED systems to be used in two venues simultaneously. Every quarter, Drama and Dance are mounting productions in different venues at the same time. In addition, UTS produces shows throughout the year that consistently conflict with Drama's mainstage productions.
One very significant benefit of having a total of sixty fixtures would be the opportunity for a designer to craft a lighting plot made up entirely of the LED fixtures. In the Penthouse Theatre, for example, this could be done with just sixty fixtures. It would be a extremely valuable and rare opportunity for a designer to take full advantage of this fixture's unique properties and to make global color shifts in the entire stage environment.

ETC EDLT Lens 6.25"

$193.20 16 $3,091.20
Description

Each 6.25" lens could have either a 19, 26, 36, or 50 degree beam. We would like to make the final determination of those beams once we know what the final award is.

[Quote provided by Barbizon Light of the Rockies in Denver, CO. Barbizon has been the most competitive bidder in our lighting equipment purchases over the last ten years.]

Justification

The bodies do not include lenses and specific lenses need to be purchased separately. The EDLT lens is an enhanced definition lens that provides approximately 10% more output than conventional lenses. They are especially well suited to the LED fixtures because they help compensate for the LED's dimmer output (in most colors,) compared to conventional fixtures.

We are proposing a few less lenses than bodies in the secondary group to account for the extra lenses in the primary group.

ETC EDLT Lens 7.5"

$227.70 4 $910.80
Description

Each 7.5" lens could have either a 14 or 70 degree beam. We would like to make the final determination of those beams once we know what the final award is.

[Quote provided by Barbizon Light of the Rockies in Denver, CO. Barbizon has been the most competitive bidder in our lighting equipment purchases over the last ten years.]

Justification

The bodies do not include lenses and specific lenses need to be purchased separately. The EDLT lens is an enhanced definition lens that provides approximately 10% more output than conventional lenses. They are especially well suited to the LED fixtures because they help compensate for the LED's dimmer output (in most colors,) compared to conventional fixtures.

We are proposing a few less lenses than bodies in the secondary group to account for the extra lenses in the primary group.

5-pin DMX Cable (Proplex XLR)-50'

$87.80 2 $175.60
Description

A cable required to remotely control the fixture via a DMX Controller.

Justification

Each Lustr2 needs one power cable (a 'PowerCon' cable,) and control cable (a DMX cable,) in order to operate.

5-pin DMX Cable (Proplex XLR)-25'

$60.50 10 $605.00
Description

A cable required to remotely control the fixture via a DMX Controller.

Justification

Each Lustr2 needs one power cable (a 'PowerCon' cable,) and control cable (a DMX cable,) in order to operate.

5-pin DMX Cable (Proplex XLR)-10'

$44.30 10 $443.00
Description

A cable required to remotely control the fixture via a DMX Controller.

Justification

Each Lustr2 needs one power cable (a 'PowerCon' cable,) and control cable (a DMX cable,) in order to operate.

Hybrid PowerCon/DMX Cable 25'

$129.40 4 $517.60
Description

A dual cable with both DMX and a PowerCon connector that allows fixtures to be hung more than five feet away from a power feed and/or allows for multiple fixtures to be ‘daisy-chained’ in their installation. [This is not a standard type of extension cord.]

Justification

The Hybrid cable simplifies the connection of multiple Lustr2 units and saves time in set up compared to separate PowerCon jumpers and DMX cables. It is a more 'foolproof' way to insure correct set up of the fixtures by students who may not have any prior experience with them.

Hybrid PowerCon/DMX Cable 10'

$89.60 6 $537.60
Description

A dual cable with both DMX and a PowerCon connector that allows fixtures to be hung more than five feet away from a power feed and/or allows for multiple fixtures to be ‘daisy-chained’ in their installation. [This is not a standard type of extension cord.]

Justification

The Hybrid cable simplifies the connection of multiple Lustr2 units and saves time in set up compared to separate PowerCon jumpers and DMX cables. It is a more 'foolproof' way to insure correct set up of the fixtures by students who may not have any prior experience with them.

Hybrid PowerCon/DMX Cable 5'

$76.70 4 $306.80
Description

A dual cable with both DMX and a PowerCon connector that allows for multiple fixtures to be ‘daisy-chained’ in their installation. [This is not a standard type of extension cord.]

Justification

The Hybrid cable simplifies the connection of multiple Lustr2 units and saves time in set up compared to separate PowerCon jumpers and DMX cables. It is a more 'foolproof' way to insure correct set up of the fixtures by students who may not have any prior experience with them.

Smooth Wash Diffuser 7.5"

$22.40 2 $44.80
Description

A diffuser that goes into the color accessory slot of the light.

Justification

Because the beam of the Lustr2 has such a flat field, a diffuser is sometimes required with two lights overlap to mitigate a ‘bright spot’ where the beams overlap. This accessory is only useful in some circumstances, and we don’t feel we need one for every light purchased.

Smooth Wash Diffuser 6.25"

$21.20 8 $169.60
Description

A diffuser that goes into the color accessory slot of the light.

Justification

Because the beam of the Lustr2 has such a flat field, a diffuser is sometimes required with two lights overlap to mitigate a ‘bright spot’ where the beams overlap. This accessory is only useful in some circumstances, and we don’t feel we need one for every light purchased.

Tax

$4,577.82 1 $4,577.82
Description

Sales Tax

Justification

Total requested: $137,529.07

Total funded: $137,529.07

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