Proposal

No annual report

Introduction

Proposal ID 2015-016
Submitted January 13, 2015
Owner EleanorF
Department Aeronautics and Astronautics
Category Machinery & Research
Funding Status Fully Funded
Metric Score 3.99

Contacts

Primary
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Eleanor Forbes
  • Student Research Assistant
  • egf6@uw.edu
  • 3607740902
  • 5009 16th ave NE, Seattle WA 98105
Budget
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Uri Shumlak
  • Interim Chair, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
  • shumlak@aa.washington.edu
  • (206) 616-1986
  • Box 352250
Dean
  • Name
  • Title
  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailbox
  • Michael Bragg
  • Dean of Engineering
  • mbragg@uw.edu
  • (206) 543-1829
  • Box 352180

Descriptions

Abstract

This proposal seeks funding for an ultra fast framing camera to aid in the study of phenomena that occur on submicrosecond to millisecond timescales. The camera has the benefits of extremely short exposure time, rapid frame rates of up to ten million frames per second (FPS), and a high frame capacity of 128-256 images. A variable exposure time allows for a range of applications of the camera, but its primary use would be to image the evolution of plasma discharges in experiments in the Aeronautics & Astronautics and Earth & Space Science departments. In such experiments, plasma evolution typically occurs on submicrosecond timescales, much faster than the recording speed of contemporary high-speed cameras. A fast framing camera is able to record images of events that happen on these timescales and would be instrumental in furthering researchers’ understanding of plasma evolution. New fast-framing cameras are portable and can easily be transported between research labs. The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch Project has the equipment and experience with fast framing cameras to support the use of this technology and educate researchers from other labs in its operation.

Category Justification

The fast-framing camera is a precision diagnostic to be used in advanced research, and thus falls within the category of machinery and research.

Background

The nature of plasma behavior in laboratory experiments presents significant challenges to collecting data. Plasma is extremely hot, requiring most of the diagnostics to be located external to the experiment. Further challenges arise from the experimental time scale. For example, plasma generation, stabilization, and degradation in ZaP typically lasts between a total of 10 to 100 microseconds. Diagnostics that take single measurements or measurements at one point in the plasma may be timed to ensure accurate data collection. Creating two dimensional, time-resolved measurements is more difficult, as the plasma tends to fluctuate quickly throughout the experiment. One diagnostic that may be used to make such measurements is a fast-framing camera.
The fast-framing camera achieves high frame rates using a frame transfer complementary metal-oxide sensor (FTCMOS) and image intensifiers to produce detectable images from a short exposure. A typical high speed camera records images individually on a CCD (charge coupled device) and saves every image externally by reading each individual pixel, resulting in a maximum recording rate of several thousand images (frames) per second. The fast-framing camera stores the images directly in the memory of the FTCMOS and transfers the data to an external memory after all images have been recorded. This eliminates the time delay required to store the image immediately to memory and enables recording rates of ten million frames per second. The selected camera would be able to image 128-256 frames per recording (depending on frame resolution), all within 13-26 microseconds. The framing rate and exposure time may be adjusted to record over longer periods of time.
A special feature of the camera is the inclusion of UV-grade optics. This will allow researchers to integrate the camera into a spectrometer system. Spectroscopy can be used to measure velocity, ion temperature, density, and magnetic field profiles of a plasma. This is valuable information that grants even more insight into the behavior of plasma.
The current framing camera utilized in ZaP is an IMACON 790, a model from the 1970’s. The camera previously recorded all images on Polaroid film until it was turned into a digital system by appending a Canon DSLR camera. The IMACON has two framing units with interframe times of 2 microseconds and 200 nanoseconds. A maximum of eight frames may be obtained during a single series. Using the 200 nanosecond framing unit requires a very bright plasma to capture quality images. Due to its age the camera cannot be repaired if it malfunctions, and it is obsolete compared to even the most basic fast-framing cameras made today. A new fast-framing camera uses an image intensifier which requires less light to be emitted from the plasma to take a good picture. Increased framing capability of a new camera would allow for better resolution of plasma behavior over time, as the eight frame system has significant gaps between frames where motion in the plasma occurs.
A Shimadzu representative visited the ZaP lab to demonstrate the capabilities of the Shimadzu Hypervision HPV-X fast framing camera. This video shows the difference between a recording made with the camera currently used by ZaP and a recording made using the HPV-X: http://youtu.be/VEbxlTzmqoo.

Benefits to Students and the University

A fast-framing camera would greatly enhance the ability of plasma researchers at the University of Washington to understand the evolution of plasma structures in various experiments. A new camera with increased framing capacity allows for extended observation of phenomena. Reduced interframe time gives a clearer image of how the plasma behaves, while increasing the number of frames creates a larger window to capture the varying events that occur during plasma experiments, such as the growth of unstable structures and plasma turbulence. The camera has the additional functionality of optically coupling with a spectroscopy system to obtain other key measurements of plasma behavior such as velocity and temperature.
The camera has direct benefits for student researchers. It will provide graduate and undergraduate students with hands-on experience in both diagnostic implementation and data analysis. Students would have an opportunity to learn about image processing and operations of a spectrometer, skills that are applicable in many research and development projects. Interpretation of the data acquired by a fast-framing camera does not require the sophisticated analysis inherent to other plasma diagnostics. This feature makes it uniquely appropriate for students at all levels - first-year undergraduate to graduate students - to quickly understand plasma behavior. In addition, students operating the camera would be able to significantly contribute to plasma research projects and plasma science.
A major difficulty of making scientific research accessible is the complexity of data interpretation. To an individual with no scientific background, scope traces and raw numbers convey little relatable information. The fast framing camera can be used to educate university students and the general public about fusion and advanced propulsion research at the University of Washington. During Engineering Discovery Days students of all ages visit ZaP and other plasma labs. To demonstrate what a plasma looks like, tools such as a Jacob’s ladder and plasma ball are used, but challenges arise from describing the plasma behavior seen in the lab. To someone unfamiliar with the experiment, it is hard to imagine a column of plasma that moves, stabilizes, and breaks apart in the blink of an eye. Footage of the plasma can be understood by audiences of every age. Concepts such as “kink” and “sausage” instabilities (so-called due to their physical shapes), and even plasma turbulence, are presented in a format that is accessible to adults and children alike. By making plasma and fusion more approachable, labs hope to inspire young minds to pursue degrees in science and technology at the University of Washington.

Departmental Endorsements

Dear STF Review Committee:
I am writing to express my strong support for the STF proposal by Eleanor Forbes to acquire an ultra fast framing camera to study high-speed plasma dynamics. Such a camera would provide a unique capability to monitor plasma motion and investigate fundamental
plasma science in a manner that would be accessible to student researchers. An ultra fast framing camera is widely applicable to many experimental projects at the University of Washington. However, the camera’s cost is too prohibitively high for any single research
project to purchase. Purchasing this camera as a shared resource through the STF proposal process offers an ideal solution.
While the camera has immediate applications to several plasma research projects and laboratories on the UW campus, the availability and capability of this camera will likely spawn additional ideas. The camera is easy to use and requires no special expertise, so
minimal training is required for students to become proficient and quickly produce useful images and videos.
Feel free to call me if I can provide any additional information.

Sincerely,
Uri Shumlak
Professor and Acting Department Chair, Aeronautics & Astronautics

I wish to give my strongest endorsement to this proposal. High speed cameras can provide important diagnostics to a host of experiments, including plasma systems and high velocity impactors. In this type of research efforts, processes are occurring on
the millisecond time scale and a high speed camera is the only mechanism to provide imaging of dynamics.
I know of students in Aeronautics and Astronautics, Earth and Space Sciences and Physics that would be very interested in being able to use such a camera in their research. Unfortunately, the price of such a camera is typically out of the domain of individual
research grants and I am pleased that the students are taking the initiative to try and acquire this tool which will greatly aid their research efforts.
Because of the substantial increase in research capacity that proposed high speed camera would provide to our students involved in research, I fully endorse the students STF application.

Prof. Robert Winglee
Chair, Department of Earth & Space Sciences

Dear Board:
I am delighted to offer my strong endorsement for this proposal. One of the Department’s grand visions is to develop fusion energy for power plants on Earth as well as for propulsion in Space. Fusion research is critical for plentiful clean energy on our planet and for the quest to make humankind a multi-planetary species. The work is inherently interdisciplinary, involving several
departments on campus, and many students from a variety of backgrounds. We have undergraduates and graduates who are physicists, astrophysicists, mechanical engineers, aerospace engineers, mathematicians, many of whom then proceed on to distinguished careers
around the world.
The experimental work in the laboratory rests on high-speed diagnostics that are able to capture the evolution of plasma parameters on nanosecond to microsecond time-scales. Many of these diagnostics are developed by students in-house, such as magnetic probes, and interferometers. These are critical measurements but unfortunately only provide a partial picture of the true behavior of the plasma. Our existing still frame cameras are worth a thousand signals but take only a single snapshot. A movie camera capable of taking a series of images at tens of millions of frames per second would be worth a thousand thousand signals. With a single frame camera,
we repeat shots, with several minutes per shot that are themselves not necessarily repeatable, and adjust the exposure time of the still camera to stitch together the evolution of the plasma. With the proposed camera, a single shot will already provide the complete picture, with a couple of order magnitude in time savings, and without the statistical errors.
These cameras have only recently come on the market, and would provide a capability to all students on campus that can only be matched by a handful of universities and research institutions around the world. If the Board supports this proposal, the University of Washington will be one of the select few, and would support a critical tool for fusion energy research.

Sincerely,
Prof. Setthivone You, Aeronautics & Astronautics

I give my highest endorsement to this STF proposal for a fast-framing camera. A demonstration model was recently fielded in the ZaP-HD laboratory, and the resulting videos greatly exceeded my expectations: The videos were remarkably clear, and in fact fascinating to watch. The detailed evolution of the formation and assembly of the ZaP-HD plasma column instantly brought new insight into the operation of the experiment. Clear physical phenomena (magnetic structure formation, instability growth, turbulence formation, etc.) unfolded on the very first demonstration shots. The detail is sufficient that quantitative data can be obtained from the images as well (e.g., velocity, instability wavelengths, etc.). The images are orders of magnitude more valuable to understanding than the 8 frames we presently obtain from the existing 1970-era Imacon framing camera. This instrument would be a game-changer in operation of ZaP-HD, as each set of experimental parameters can be quickly be visually “analyzed” and guide experimental campaigns. I collaborate on the $100M+ Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory’s NSTX spherical torus plasma experiment, and they found a high-speed camera has proven invaluable for operations: In fact, they will delay operations if the camera is not functional. I am sure this fast-framing camera will have a similar effect on University of Washington experiments, for plasma physics and other experiments with high-speed
phenomena. I strongly endorse this STF proposal.

Prof. Brian A. Nelson, Electrical Engineering

Installation Timeline

Upon receipt of funding, the camera would be ordered immediately. Each fast-framing camera is constructed individually and can take between two and three months to manufacture.

Resources Provided by Department

A suitable tripod and camera triggering system are already in place within the ZaP lab. Lab employees have prior experience with fast-framing camera use and data processing.

Access Restrictions (if any)

The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch lab is located in the basement of AERB. The lab is typically open from 8 am to 4:30 pm every day, but lab personnel may be contacted at any time via email. The camera would be housed at ZaP but available for extended loans to undergraduate students, graduate students, and professionals of other labs by request. Due to the complexity of operating the camera, it would only be available to individual students who have the proper lab support and infrastructure to operate and interface with the camera.

Student Endorsements

A fast camera with speeds above 10 MFPS would certainly be valuable for HIT-SI3. Our lab purchased a Phantom camera with speeds of several hundred thousand frames per second and it’s proved to be a valuable diagnostic tool. It serves as our detector for spectroscopy and we’ve learned about plasma-wall interaction with it. With still cameras, we saw flashes on the wall of our chamber, and with the high-speed camera we were able to study them on a microsecond time-scale. We learned that they were a heating process, in sync with our driving voltages, and we were able to take steps to change them. How each flash happens is still a mystery, so this camera would allow us to study the temporal details of how the plasma approaches the wall, how it concentrates, and we can look for telltale signs of known phenomena like plasma sheath breakdown, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, signs of diverted field lines, etc. Additionally, our movies of the plasma volume change dramatically between frames. Increasing the time resolution by a factor of ten would help us understand the dynamics.

Aaron Hossack, PhD Candidate
HIT-SI3 Research Group
University of Washington

To whom it may concern,

The following is a letter of reference in support of a proposal by Eleanor Forbes to purchase for the Aeronautics and Astronautics department a fast framing camera using Student Technology funds. In most fundamental plasma physics experiments, plasma lifetimes are on the order of a few microseconds and require very fast cameras for imaging. Current imaging equipment available to the department is not sufficient to fully capture the 3-D dynamics of many laboratory plasma experiments conducted by the Aeronautics & Astronautics department. With faster imaging equipment, it will be possible to record a complete time evolution of the plasma, providing significant insight into understanding the physics of plasmas related to astrophysics, fusion energy and space propulsion research.

The future in science and technology will be decided by the soon-to-be scientists, researchers and engineers. Therefore it is critical to expose undergraduates to challenging and current laboratory research so that they are prepared to pursue advanced careers in the sciences. Additionally, it is important for research opportunities for undergraduates to not only be accessible, but intellectually engaging. The set-up and operation of a fast framing camera would be an excellent opportunity for undergraduate involvement in many of the plasma experiments in the department that is practical, hands-on and plays a significant role in contributing to university-level research.

Best regards,

The MOCHI.LabJet team,

Evan G. Carroll, Graduate Research Assistant
Alex Card, Graduate Research Assistant
Jens von der Linden, Graduate Research Assistant
Morgan Quinley, Graduate Student
Keon Vereen, Graduate Research Assistant
Manalo Azuara, Graduate Student
Eric Lavine, Graduate Student

The design and construction of an experimental apparatus is only a piece of the scientific process. In order to benefit fully from an experiment, as much data should be taken as is reasonably possible. A high-speed camera is the ideal supplemental plasma diagnostic tool because of the very short, microsecond-range duration of plasma trials.
Many experiments have the luxury of visual observation, allowing for immediate corrections of their approach. With such a short time-interval this is not possible in plasma science. A high-speed camera allows fast diagnosis of whether the experiment is operating as intended, and consequently what can be done to fix it. It will provide solid benefits to the plasma science environment by allowing visual confirmation of plasma connection in our test chamber and by providing undergraduates like myself an accessible and interesting path into the observational side of the science.
Additionally, animations compiled with the camera are going to allow deeper intuitive insight into the nature of the A&A department’s plasma experiments. These animations will be great tools for popularizing the experiments across campus and raising public awareness about plasma science.

Danny Crews, Undergraduate Research Assistant, MOCHI

A new Hadland HPV-X ultra-high speed camera would help the ZaP-HD plasma experiment tremendously. Corroborating standard plasma diagnostics with photography allows operators to quickly troubleshoot the ZaP-HD experiment when problems arise, and in the case of a well-behaved plasma, corroboration provides valuable assurance that the highly sensitive diagnostics are correct. Because our plasma has a relatively short life (100 microseconds) and phenomena occur quickly (100 nanoseconds), ultra high-speed photography is the only option to capture the dynamics of global plasma structure.
The new ZaP-HD experiment features a vacuum tank with exceptional optical access that permits photography of the entire plasma configuration. Unfortunately, our current high-speed camera is not up to the task. We use a 1986 Hadland Imacon 790 that captures only 8 low-resolution images at a maximum speed of 5 million frames per second. At this rate our 8 images (approximately 9K pixels each) span a total of 1.6 microseconds. The camera’s poor resolution makes plasma structures blurry, and the odds of capturing interesting phenomena are low due to the short total camera operation time. For comparison, with a Hadland HPV-X camera at the same framing speed we could capture 256 frames (100K pixels each) over a period of 51.2 microseconds. For each experiment pulse, the new HPV-X would collect approximately 350 times the information of our current fast framing camera.
Recently, the ZaP-HD lab had an opportunity to test an HPV-X camera with absolutely stunning results. The videos it produced were a hot item around the plasma group, with multiple professors remarking they could watch the videos “for hours”. After operating the experiment with the camera for only 1.5 days, we were able to extract consistent plasma flow velocities, identify new dynamics in the pinch formation region, locate with certainty an electrical arc that has plagued our experiment since the start of operations, collect high resolution turbulent flow imagery, and discover a pooling of plasma at the end of our electrodes beyond the reach of
other diagnostics. More was learned in these 1.5 days with the HPV-X camera than in the previous two months of operation with our standard diagnostics suite.
The HPV-X camera unveils physical phenomena in a manner unprecedented at any UW plasma physics lab. In addition to revealing new information, its imagery is helpful for new plasma physics students lacking the years of study needed to correctly interpret plasma diagnostics. Its special ability to aid both seasoned physicists and plasma novices grasp and control the underlying dynamics in their experiments makes it of extreme value for any university level plasma physics research.

Jon Weed,
ZaP Lab Graduate Student

My name is Ian Johnson and I’m a graduate student in the Advanced Propulsion Laboratory, an arm of plasma physics wing of the Earth and Space Science Department. We’re an R&D lab for in-space thrusters, with an emphasis on increasing efficiency in order to decrease the mass of propellant required. My lab currently has graduate students from the Aerospace, Physics, and Earth and Space Science Departments. This is in addition to undergraduates from Aerospace, Electrical, Mechanical, Computer Science, and Earth and Space Science Departments. We pride ourselves on having a multi-disciplinary approach to research.
To help characterize the performance of our thrusters, one of our diagnostic methods is to image the resulting exhaust plume. We use a CoolSnap camera, bought in 2006 that can take one image per thruster discharge with exposure lengths down to 10?sec. Our current camera can give us information on the divergence angle, temperature, and large-scale shape. The capability we are currently lacking is to characterize the strength and shape of the plume instabilities, thought to be one of the largest influences on decreasing the thrusters overall efficiency. These instabilities grow on ~100nsec timescales, 2 orders of magnitude faster than we are currently able to image.
We are writing this STF proposal along with the ZaP lab as our needs are extremely similar. The ZaP fusion experiment has instabilities with timescales of ~20nsec, while our thrusters instabilities have timescales ~100nsec. Neither of us have cameras capable of imaging at those timescales. Both experiments require UV grade optics. A new, fast-framing camera would give both labs unprecedented new diagnostic ability and allow for new advances in both experiments.

Please feel free to contact myself with questions.

Ian Johnson,
APL Graduate Student

Items

Group Funded Item Unit price Quantity Subtotal
None

Shimadzu Hypervision HPV-X High Speed Camera

$235,777.50 1 $235,777.50
Description

The camera package includes
1. Shimadzu Hypervision HPV-X High Speed Camera
2. 35 - 105 mm Nikon Lens
3. 1 inch extension tube for close imaging
4. Pelican-style rugged transit case
5. Laptop controller
6. Medium-duty tripod
7. Two-year warranty

This item is tax-exempt.

Justification

The Shimadzu HPV-X uses a state-of-the-art FTCMOS sensor released in early 2014 to capture 128 frames at of 10 million frames per second. Shimadzu is affiliated with Hadland, a company that supplies many research labs at the University of Washington with imaging systems. The cameras are well-built and reliable; the 1986 Hadland Imacon used by the ZaP lab is still operational after decades of continued use. The HPV-X is a unique camera, but its price is comparable to other fast framing cameras with significantly lower frame capacities. Shipping and installation are included in the cost of the camera.

Ultraviolet Intensifier System

$47,880.00 1 $47,880.00
Description

1. UV QL Intensifier
2. UV 105 mm lens

The UV Intensifier system is an external module that, when attached to the camera, allows the camera to to record light in the UV range.

This item is tax-exempt.

Justification

The UV Intensifier System is a high speed image intensifier module produced by Hadland to interface specifically with the Shimadzu Hypervision HPV-X. It is compact and easily attaches to the camera. The module would allow researchers to image light emission in the UV range and would primarily be used for spectroscopy.

Total requested: $283,657.50

Total funded: $283,657.50

Group Funded Item Change in Unit price Change in Quantity Change in Subtotal
None

Shimadzu Hypervision HPV-X High Speed Camera

$0.00 -1 -$235,777.50
Description

The camera package includes
1. Shimadzu Hypervision HPV-X High Speed Camera
2. 35 - 105 mm Nikon Lens
3. 1 inch extension tube for close imaging
4. Pelican-style rugged transit case
5. Laptop controller
6. Medium-duty tripod
7. Two-year warranty

This item is tax-exempt.

Justification

The Shimadzu HPV-X uses a state-of-the-art FTCMOS sensor released in early 2014 to capture 128 frames at of 10 million frames per second. Shimadzu is affiliated with Hadland, a company that supplies many research labs at the University of Washington with imaging systems. The cameras are well-built and reliable; the 1986 Hadland Imacon used by the ZaP lab is still operational after decades of continued use. The HPV-X is a unique camera, but its price is comparable to other fast framing cameras with significantly lower frame capacities. Shipping and installation are included in the cost of the camera.

Ultraviolet Intensifier System

$0.00 -1 -$47,880.00
Description

1. UV QL Intensifier
2. UV 105 mm lens

The UV Intensifier system is an external module that, when attached to the camera, allows the camera to to record light in the UV range.

This item is tax-exempt.

Justification

The UV Intensifier System is a high speed image intensifier module produced by Hadland to interface specifically with the Shimadzu Hypervision HPV-X. It is compact and easily attaches to the camera. The module would allow researchers to image light emission in the UV range and would primarily be used for spectroscopy.

None

Kirana-05M

$218,925.06 1 $218,925.06
Description

Kirana-05M Ultra High Speed Video Camera
Quote from Specialized Imaging - Frank Kosel

924 x 768 pixels at 10 bits per frame at all frame rates from 1000 to 5 million frames per second. Shutter speeds down to 100 ns, 180 frames per event, Start-Center-End Trigger, GBit Ethernet control, Live video Focus, Control and Image Transfers software included.

This item is tax-exempt.

Justification

The Kirana-05M uses a unique micro-CMOS chip to combine the high resolution of an ultra high-speed framing camera with the flexibility of a digital video camera. The Kirana is capable of taking 180 frames at speeds of up to 5 million frames per second with excellent resolution.

Ultraviolet Intensifier

$59,825.55 1 $59,825.55
Description

SIL2-25HG50-D 25 mm MCP Hybrid DUo Image Intensifier with S20UV photocathode and P46 phosphor screen

Quote provided by Specialized Imaging - Frank Kosel

Up to 1 million frames per second, gain up to 500,000X. Gate times from DC down to 50 ns, phosphor decay typ. 300 ns.

Justification

The Ultraviolet intensifier is designed to interface specifically with the Kirana-05M camera. The module uses a phosphor screen to image light in the ultraviolet range. This allows the ultra fast framing camera to be used for spectroscopy applications as well as imaging.

Relay Optics

$1,827.00 1 $1,827.00
Description

Relay optics for SIL2 to Kirana

Quote provided by Specialized Imaging - Frank Kosel

Optics used to connect the UV intensifier to the camera.

This item is tax-exempt.

Justification

Heavy Duty Tripod

$2,871.00 1 $2,871.00
Description

Heavy Duty Hercules Tripod

Quote provided by Specialized Imaging - Frank Kosel

A heavy duty tripod with elevator and geared head.

This item is tax-exempt.

Justification

This tripod allows for precise and stable positioning of the camera.

Shipping & Handling

$150.00 1 $150.00
Description

Quote provided by Specialized Imaging - Frank Kosel

Ships in shock-proof case.

Justification

Supplemental request: -$58.89

Deicision: Funded

Group Funded Item Unit price Quantity Subtotal
None

Shimadzu Hypervision HPV-X High Speed Camera

$235,777.50 0 $0.00
Description

The camera package includes
1. Shimadzu Hypervision HPV-X High Speed Camera
2. 35 - 105 mm Nikon Lens
3. 1 inch extension tube for close imaging
4. Pelican-style rugged transit case
5. Laptop controller
6. Medium-duty tripod
7. Two-year warranty

This item is tax-exempt.

Justification

The Shimadzu HPV-X uses a state-of-the-art FTCMOS sensor released in early 2014 to capture 128 frames at of 10 million frames per second. Shimadzu is affiliated with Hadland, a company that supplies many research labs at the University of Washington with imaging systems. The cameras are well-built and reliable; the 1986 Hadland Imacon used by the ZaP lab is still operational after decades of continued use. The HPV-X is a unique camera, but its price is comparable to other fast framing cameras with significantly lower frame capacities. Shipping and installation are included in the cost of the camera.

Ultraviolet Intensifier System

$47,880.00 0 $0.00
Description

1. UV QL Intensifier
2. UV 105 mm lens

The UV Intensifier system is an external module that, when attached to the camera, allows the camera to to record light in the UV range.

This item is tax-exempt.

Justification

The UV Intensifier System is a high speed image intensifier module produced by Hadland to interface specifically with the Shimadzu Hypervision HPV-X. It is compact and easily attaches to the camera. The module would allow researchers to image light emission in the UV range and would primarily be used for spectroscopy.

None

Kirana-05M

$218,925.06 1 $218,925.06
Description

Kirana-05M Ultra High Speed Video Camera
Quote from Specialized Imaging - Frank Kosel

924 x 768 pixels at 10 bits per frame at all frame rates from 1000 to 5 million frames per second. Shutter speeds down to 100 ns, 180 frames per event, Start-Center-End Trigger, GBit Ethernet control, Live video Focus, Control and Image Transfers software included.

This item is tax-exempt.

Justification

The Kirana-05M uses a unique micro-CMOS chip to combine the high resolution of an ultra high-speed framing camera with the flexibility of a digital video camera. The Kirana is capable of taking 180 frames at speeds of up to 5 million frames per second with excellent resolution.

Ultraviolet Intensifier

$59,825.55 1 $59,825.55
Description

SIL2-25HG50-D 25 mm MCP Hybrid DUo Image Intensifier with S20UV photocathode and P46 phosphor screen

Quote provided by Specialized Imaging - Frank Kosel

Up to 1 million frames per second, gain up to 500,000X. Gate times from DC down to 50 ns, phosphor decay typ. 300 ns.

Justification

The Ultraviolet intensifier is designed to interface specifically with the Kirana-05M camera. The module uses a phosphor screen to image light in the ultraviolet range. This allows the ultra fast framing camera to be used for spectroscopy applications as well as imaging.

Relay Optics

$1,827.00 1 $1,827.00
Description

Relay optics for SIL2 to Kirana

Quote provided by Specialized Imaging - Frank Kosel

Optics used to connect the UV intensifier to the camera.

This item is tax-exempt.

Justification

Heavy Duty Tripod

$2,871.00 1 $2,871.00
Description

Heavy Duty Hercules Tripod

Quote provided by Specialized Imaging - Frank Kosel

A heavy duty tripod with elevator and geared head.

This item is tax-exempt.

Justification

This tripod allows for precise and stable positioning of the camera.

Shipping & Handling

$150.00 1 $150.00
Description

Quote provided by Specialized Imaging - Frank Kosel

Ships in shock-proof case.

Justification

Overall total funded: $283,598.61

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